Checklists delegate a process, not a task

One of the things that tends to plague solo business owners and managers in smaller companies is delegating complex tasks as the company grows. In “E-Myth” fashion, the owner and technician (whatever that means in your line of work) is faced with the choice of delegation or overwhelm as their company grows. Sometimes there are skills issues that slow this delegation, but I often find that the complexity of a simple (to the owner) task contributes to the challenge. Consider a task that is taken for granted by someone who has done it for years. Being able to take it for granted depends on experience and the benefit of having the mental version of muscle memory to perform these tasks. The delegating party doesn’t have to think hard to remember the steps, even if the steps are challenging, technical or difficult. Where things get interesting is when you delegate a technical task such as diagnosing a SQL problem.

Don’t worry if you don’t know what SQL is – it doesn’t matter. Replace my references to SQL with a relevant and challenging delegation subject. The subject can be any detailed topical area (technical or not) in your business, whether it’s international legal contracts, electronic ignitions or chainsaw chain sharpening. The WHAT doesn’t matter. The process is what we’re getting at.

Checklists build confidence

When I had to turn over some detailed SQL troubleshooting to folks who weren’t super experienced at SQL diagnosis, the area that tended to stop them wasn’t the individual tasks performed during diagnosis. The problem was determining (or knowing) which step to perform first… and why. This created a mental roadblock at first, even though these folks could perform each of the steps that I would perform while diagnosing a SQL problem. Their biggest challenge was not performing the troubleshooting tasks, it was knowing which tasks to do and in what order to perform them.

I solved this challenge (and some similar ones) with simple checklists. The solution is an obvious one to solve the roadblock that held up productive delegation of this work. Once I provided a checklist with some description of why I perform the steps at the time I perform them, things changed. Suddenly, I wasn’t getting questions about which step to try first, or “What should I try next?”. The checklists were taking the one remaining confusing thing off the table: What to do, when to do it and why to do it at that moment.

When you talk to someone who is experienced in diagnosing problems or performing similar tasks like this – they have an experience-based, innate sense of what to try first, next and next. While some of it is Occam’s razor, a good bit of what to do when comes from having been there before. The checklists helped fill a good bit of that experience gap simply by giving folks a sequence to follow even though it was simply sequencing tasks they already knew how to perform. Eventually, their own experience fills in the gaps and they start adding their own checklist steps and notes for why that step is next.

One of the things I noticed when providing a checklist is that the skills improved quickly once they had the list to follow. Rather than facing the blank page of “what do I do first” and the mental overhead that creates, these folks were using the checklist to help them learn the progression of steps. This eliminates the overhead and provides the mental headroom to improve their SQL skills while the checklist provides a framework or a process to work from.

Checklists – Not solely for the owner

The benefits of delegation checklists aren’t limited to owner / manager delegation. The often-missing (or incomplete) but sorely needed process documentation across the entire business is tough to get rolling. Rather than looking at it like the great American novel, start with what helps right now. Who has the next vacation? Who was recently out sick? Start with their tasks. Once you get rolling, it’ll be easier to step into the job and identity the types of tasks that demand a checklist. The priority of need for these checklists will start to become more apparent with each vacation, sick day and checklist creation.

Inauguration Week, a time to stay focused

I have written on this topic several times over the last 12 years: Inauguration Week. More specifically, what happens to the business world after Inauguration Day. When Bush 43 took over in 2001, there was hand wringing. Before Obama took over in 2009, there was hand wringing. And now, with Trump’s takeover days away, the sound of hands (w)ringing, toll yet again.

The problem? That new President-elect. “He / his policies / his party’s policies will ruin my business.” . Doesn’t matter which President-elect, even though it’s hard to imagine that the last three or four president-elects could be more different from one another. Even so, I hear the same refrain I’ve heard every four to eight years.

I can’t start a business with so-and-so / whichever party coming into power.

My business is in trouble with so-and-so / whichever party coming into power.

Sure, there is some impact

I don’t mean to say there won’t be some impact. This time around, like every time, there is likely to be some impact on the energy business, on taxes, on healthcare, etc. Thing is, they’re impacted seemingly all the time by legislation from both parties, by world events (war, finance, technology changes, OPEC) and more. Is the price of gas / diesel different than it was before Obama? Before Bush 43? Sure. And it will be pretty much every week for years until some point way off in the future when technology matures past the use of those fuels.

However, when it comes to most businesses, the impact is usually trivial and the concern overblown. How you serve your customers and how effectively you sell and market to them has a much bigger impact in most cases than anything some randomly chosen President can do.

Sure, there is a lot of change in Washington. There will be, as always, a lot of pieces moving around on the chess board, and there will be plenty of drama in the news. As there always is.

Little, if any, of this has anything to do with the success of your coffee shop, sandwich store, plumbing business, clothing store, software consultancy, etc.

Don’t let Inauguration Week and a new President distract you and your team. Stay focused on your plan and your goals.

Step away from the drama

There is plenty to look at in the news that can make you take your eye off the ball. Don’t let it win. There is plenty to distract and worry your employees and contractors. YOU have to maintain momentum and leadership. not the TV news. It’s your job to make sure your team doesn’t get distracted and lose confidence over whatever’s going on in the news.

Use all the change as a reason to refocus and stay focused. Use it to rally your team. Remind them that no President has ever had a dramatic effect on your business. Be sure they know that you believe that the group of people working there now will not be the one to allow this (or any) President to be the first to negatively impact your business.

I know this might seem silly to some, but the thought processes are out there. People are always worried about their future when these kinds of changes occur. It’s easy and the news doesn’t help.

You have a plan for the year, right?

I’m sure you have a plan for the year. We’re already halfway through January. Remind your team of where you are toward your January and 1st quarter targets. Given the lack of likely impact by the changes in DC, it’s an opportunity to show your team what early trends look like.

Your team and your market has had over two months since the election to settle down. If your business is down since that time, I hope you know why. It might be normal for this time of year. If it isn’t, determine the cause and share it with your team. The last thing they need is to let the belief that four or eight years of that is inevitable.

For the same reason, if your business is up over the last two months, be sure to explain why. Your team needs to know why and how their work is affecting results and not that something completely out of their control (like political change) is driving your business’s performance.

Keep them up to date on the plan, its progress and course corrections you’re making. Keep your eye (and theirs) on the ball.

My business is too small!

It may seem that the strategies and tactics we talk about here that are intended to improve your business might relate solely to bigger businesses. A company with lots of staff, a big office and plenty of cash can make these things happen easily, right? And these things apply only to those bigger companies, at least, that’s what you might be thinking. Thing is, that really isn’t true. If your first thought tends to be “my business is too small to do that“, give yourself a chance. Step back a bit and look deeper at what we’re trying to accomplish and let the complexity fade to the background. The key is to pan for gold: find the fundamental outcome that these discussions are about.

A small company will almost never implement things the same way a bigger one would. That doesn’t mean that the small company shouldn’t implement them. Both have the same fundamental needs, like more sales, better leads, faster delivery (or something), and so on.

For example, the discussion might be something that seems complex, like a marketing calendar or lead curation. Both of those things may seem like overkill for a small company – but neither of them are. If we drill down into what they’re trying to accomplish, I think that will become evident.

Let’s talk about what lead curation really is. Why? It’s a great example of one of these “bigger business” things can be implemented by a small, or even one person business… Even if you think “my business is too small”.

What is lead curation?

Leads come into your reach in different stages. They might be ready to buy. The late Chet Holmes said his experience showed that three percent of your market is always ready to buy. The other 97% might be researching, recently decided to investigate, may have determined that their existing solution isn’t doing what they need, and so on. Out of 100 or 100,000 leads, you will find natural groupings like this.

If someone is ready to buy, your sales team (even if the entire team is you) needs to know they’re ready so that someone can start a “ready to buy” conversation with that lead. If someone from your team (or you) have an early-in-the-process kind of conversation with them, you may lose them.

A lead who has recently started researching solutions like yours will likely be put off by a sales person who opens a “ready to buy” conversation. Someone else (or you, if there is no someone else) needs to have the kind of conversation with that lead that will help fulfill their research needs as it relates to your product. This might be the time to provide them with a comparison form (ie: buyer’s guide) that helps them make a purchase decision.

For each stage a lead is in, the conversation that the lead needs to have with your sales team (or you) is a conversation that helps them come to the conclusion that it’s time to move to the next stage. Bear in mind, they don’t necessarily think in these stages, but that doesn’t mean they don’t exist.

That is but one example of “something your business should do”. It’s a good example of something that a bigger company might have software or some sort of system to manage.

You may not have or need those things, but that doesn’t mean the process isn’t important to your success and growth.

“My business is too small for lead curation”

Based on this description of lead curation, it’s not a size thing. It’s all about having the right conversations with people based on where they are in the process of deciding to buy. The smallest company needs to do this – and in fact, the smallest companies are both awesome and horrible at this. You’ll either see them having the same conversation with every lead (horrible), or they will cater very specifically to each lead (awesome).

For a small business, figuring out how to perform lead curation and keep track of what has been done to move your leads through each stage of buying is still important. It isn’t important how the smallest of small businesses does this. It isn’t important how the bigger business does this. It isn’t important that the bigs and the smalls use the same tools or techniques.

What’s important is that it gets done.

How to take the chill out of a cold email

With double digit below zero weather arriving in Montana this week, the last thing any of us need is a cold email.

What I call a cold email isn’t quite the same as a bulk email. While bulk email is indiscriminately sent to many thousands of people, a cold email might be sent to 10, 50 or 100 people. Bulk emails are seldom effective as lead generation tools, while cold emails can be an effective lead generation tool from a somewhat targeted list.

What is a cold email?

Cold emails are often written from templates and sometimes are pasted into an email program before they are sent. Sometimes, they’re mail merged (ie: personalized), sometimes not. Template-based, mail-merged emails aren’t a bad thing until you send a generic one to the decent quality lead with a message that makes little sense.

Who gets a cold email?

They’re often sent to people you might have seen or heard of at a Chamber of Commerce event – but you weren’t introduced to them and you didn’t meet. You might have their email because of a list you have (or bought) access to, such as an industry group list or a list of trade show attendees.

You might have manually harvested the email addresses from web sites of companies that might be a good fit for your services. For example, if you serve small bakeries, maybe you Google’d “bakery northwest montana”, found a list of bakeries within 100 miles, then grabbed the owner name and email from each site.

While that shows a little effort, it can all be lost depending on your next move.

The trouble with cold emails

Cold emails don’t often get a response, because their content simply doesn’t encourage you to read them, much less take action.

Cold email failures:

  • The subject line doesn’t provoke you to open the email. Instead it says something like “sender’s company name product category”. Example: “Smith-Jones Systems – Point of Sale Software”.
  • Your content is so general that it shows you made no effort to understand the recipient or their needs, so it reads like every other spam they receive.
  • The email is written from the “me, me, me” perspective (talks about the company and its services) rather than talking about the reader.
  • Your email reads as if it came from a template. While the slightest bit of work could make it personal, that effort wasn’t invested.

Making a cold email personal

This email is your proxy. If you read an email you sent last week, does it sound like you? Is it the introductory conversation you’d have in person with a prospect? My guess is that it doesn’t and it doesn’t.

The email needs to speak to a specific problem. What problem do most bakeries have that your point of sale (POS) software solves? Bakery owners don’t wake up in the morning thinking “Boy, I sure wish someone would try to sell me point of sale software today.” Yet these same bakery owners might be thinking about how annoyed they are about the inability to predict shift coverage based on sales levels, print tax reports, produce custom order tickets, add stations, or some other thing. Their staff may have complained about other problems with their POS.

40% of your clients may have used a specific POS and moved to yours because of three specific benefits, differences or improvements. Do you know what these prospect bakeries currently use? What do their people think about it? Given that 40% of your clients used that tool, you should have some specific info for bakeries still using that old POS. Send a specific email to users of that POS vs. bakeries using other software.

Observation

Have you been in their bakery and bought something so you can see how the staff reacts to working on their registers or POS stations? Did you sit there, as appropriate, and have a cup of coffee while observing how things go when they are busy? Did you listen for comments from the staff?

While you don’t want to fill an email with ALL of this info, this knowledge is critical to understanding why a baker would want your POS.

Sure, these emails are more laborious to produce, but your job is to get new clients, not see how many emails you can send.

You don’t send marketing email? This knowledge also applies to phone and in-person sales calls.

Brainstorming your 2017 Business Roadmap

It’s a hair after five am on January 2nd. 2017 is barely underway. Have you started working through the first task on the detailed 2017 business roadmap that you painstakingly carved out last month? I’m referring to your checklist of all the things you want to get done to grow and improve your business this year. I suspect that list includes a number of tasks that execute on the strategies you worked out to improve your finances, marketing, sales process, and customer service – all while edging your way into adjacent markets, right? If that’s you, I hope you stay the course, crank through your roadmap and make some great things happen.

If that isn’t you and you’re beginning to consider what aspects of your business need your focus for 2017, maybe this 2017 business roadmap brainstorming discussion will help.

What’s your business roadmap expected to accomplish?

Without knowing your specific business, it’s tough to focus on the exact challenges you’re facing. So what do we do?

Experience tells me that you likely have one or more of these four things on your todo list for 2017:

  • Increase sales.
  • Reduce expenses.
  • Improve profitability.
  • Improve quality

While those are all good things to accomplish, let me first suggest that you nail down exactly what you want to accomplish with this list.

What does “Increase sales” mean to you? Does it mean double or 10x your sales? Does it mean sell one more car a day? Does it mean that each salesperson will sell $1000 more a week?

Until you decide what “increase sales” means, it’s going to be pretty hard to hit that goal. The same goes for each of these targets. Once you’ve decided, then there’s more drill down to plan each project that moves you to these goals.

You may tire of this process, but it’s exactly what you need if you’re looking at a 2017 goals list that looks like the four item list above. You need to know how far (and where) you want to go and what is involved in producing with the increase you’re striving for. Not advisable: Wandering off in a goal’s general direction and hoping you’ll get there.

What’s hiding inside “Increase sales”?

As an example, the first item can and should be broken out into multiple goals even if each one of them isn’t applicable to your intent to triple sales:

  • Get new customers. (What kind of customers? From what lead sources?)
  • Keep more existing customers.
  • Sell more to existing customers (selling more frequently, selling more expensive things, or both.)
  • Find new products to sell to your customers. (things that make sense in the context of your relationship)
  • Find new services to sell to your customers. (ditto above)

These can be broken down as well. Drill down until each goal’s first step is obvious. You’ll have to delegate. Delegation won’t go well without specifics.

Now you have a bit of a template for breaking down annual goals so that you can start executing.

What’s involved in tripling sales?

Let’s say you sold $340,000 last year and you want to triple sales this year. A 300% increase is a tall order, but it isn’t impossible. The big question is “What makes this possible?”, because the effort is in the details.

If I ask for explicit details on what you need to do, you need to know what it’s going to take because there are resources that must be invested to make that kind of growth happen.

Let’s say you have two sales people and each of them sold $170,000. To hit $1.2 million, you’re either going to have to hire four additional sales people capable of selling $170k a year, or have your existing sales people work *at least* four times as hard, or some combination thereof.

But that’s not all.

Four more sales people will need four times the leads. Customer support will be affected by a 300% increase in sales, as will delivery, storage, accounting, supplies (and suppliers) and finances.

You need to think about exactly what it’s going to take, map it out and then start implementing your plans. Then you get to repeat the process for each goal.

Running off the roadmap

What if you miss a month? Or a quarter? How does that affect your execution of the impacted areas (service, delivery, etc)? Have a plan B figured out in advance so that you don’t have to figure out plan B while plan B is being executed. Last minute, panic or fear-driven planning seldom works out well. Think about contingencies for each aspect of your plan that has risk of failure. Communicate early and often if it happens.

Who on your team is wired for tough situations?

In every sport, a team’s best players want the ball when the game is on the line and nothing but an amazing performance will help their team win the game. Regardless of the potential cost to them personally, the risk of failure and the pressure of the moment, they take charge during tough situations.

In your business, you likely have staff members built the same way. These are typically the folks on your team who step up in tough situations, probably for the same reason. It’s how they’re wired.

How’d they get wired that way?

I haven’t ever explicitly asked someone what makes them “want the ball late in the 4th quarter” but I suspect they would answer one of two ways:

1) In the early / formative years of their career, they had responsibility thrust upon them by virtue of the work laid in front of them. As a result, they’re become accustomed to tough situations.

In this case, it’s a matter of training and familiarity. Once these situations become normal, their confidence in handling them grows over time to the point where stepping up is simply part of what they do. They don’t see it as a big deal because being the one who deals with these situations is just part of who they are. One of the things that gives them this confidence is time spent in tough situations in the past. Be sure to include your up-and-comers to participate and observe so that they also gain this experience.

2) Leaders and peers have always shown confidence in their ability to perform under pressure, under deadline and in other tough situations.

This demonstration of confidence comes in several forms. It shows in team members asking not simply how they can help, but by taking on specific tasks that they’re confident your “crisis players” can trust them to handle. It shows in leadership asking if they can help (and if so, how) rather than yielding to the temptation to check for progress so frequently that it becomes an interruption. It shows in everyone asking questions that provoke the team to think a little differently about the problem, and to question and discuss every assumption.

How do you find more people like that?

Ask.

Prepare interview questions that provide your candidates with the opportunity to explain their experiences during crisis situations. When your team nominates someone for an opening at your company, discuss your “interview crisis” questions with the nominating employee. Your goal: to gather their viewpoint of candidate’s ability to handle crisis situations, and their observations of the candidate’s behavior under pressure.

Here are a few generic examples that will help you create better, more specific questions that are more appropriate for your business: Would you want to work with this person when trying to solve a problem that threatens the life of the company? Why? What about this person’s behavior under pressure impresses or concerns you? How do the peers of this person react to this person’s crisis behavior?

How do you help in tough situations?

Ask any crisis player you know what kind of help they need most when dealing with these situations. It may take them a while to mentally step back through the process. This should encourage you to plan on a discussion after the crisis abates. It’s not unusual to have these meetings so that we can, as we are famous for, make sure this never happens again.

Reacting to what happened so that it doesn’t reoccur is important, but what’s desperately needed is getting a lot better at prevention. Ask your crisis players what would have averted this situation. Ask them if they saw this coming. Ask them who else saw the oncoming problem. Ask them who listened to those who raised the alarm and who didn’t. For that matter, did ANYONE listen?

You’re not asking for names so you can have a witch hunt, but so that you can identify those who see things before others do. Some people have a sense about these things and ask questions or notice issues long before others. These folks need to know that management has their back when they think they see something.

One way you help your existing crisis players is by identifying players in the making and by giving all of them the resources and ear they need.

Adding value to gathering feedback

Being obsessive about the customer-facing activity of your business requires some discussion about the company’s process for gathering feedback.

Ironically, these systems and processes for gathering feedback tend to be at their worst when the customer would benefit most from being heard. It isn’t much of a stretch to imagine that the process for responding to feedback typically trails a company’s collection of feedback.

Why is feedback broken?

Because feedback is a multi-faceted beast, it tends to be broken in any number of three ways, including these:

  • No one is collecting it.
  • Someone or something has made it incredibly difficult to share.
  • When it’s collected, it goes nowhere.
  • When it’s collected, it isn’t tracked (no source, no situation, no financial impact etc).
  • When action is taken on it, there’s no effort to follow up.
  • When action is taken on it, there’s no communication to the rest of your customers.
  • It isn’t used to improve the rest of the company.

Feedback has four parts

Feedback is a four part activity, so be sure that none of the pieces are broken.

The pieces are: Collection, Valuation, Action and Communication.

Collection is a matter of letting your customers be heard. Many times, simply giving them an outlet for their feedback will satisfy them. In some cases, people simply want to vent and may not care if you respond (you should). Finally, feedback often comes in the form of a suggestion, and in many of those cases, people don’t expect a response.

Collection is more than simply saying “Thanks, we got your comment”, but that should be the absolute minimum if that’s all you can manage. There’s always time to improve, since every day is a good time to improve something.

Valuation is an often ignored part of the collection process. It’s easy to take a complaint, tell someone you’re sorry and give them a coupon for next time (or some such), and then move on. Unfortunately, that wastes the value and opportunity that hides deep inside the feedback.

Valuation

Valuation assesses the feedback and its impact on your clients, and your company. For example, you may get feedback about certain things which only come from the customers who buy your most expensive products, but only during third shift on the weekends. The when and where both matter since many businesses function a bit differently during “off-hours” or non-prime shifts.

Sometimes feedback points out “reaching demand”, a client behavior (doing something, hiring someone and/or spending on something) that identifies a need that should become a part of your offering. Other times, feedback points out a failure point in a product or service that needs attention. It could be about quality and workmanship, or a lack of clarity in marketing materials or sales processes that creates a disconnect between expectations and reality.

Valuation helps you assess what parts of the company can be improved by the feedback, beyond the context of the complaint.

Taking action

If your company’s feedback loop ends at “Sorry, here’s a coupon for next time“, who misses out the most? Your management team.

That eliminates an opportunity to take a high-level view of the problem for further action. Nordstrom is famous for its empowerment of employees to make things right in these situation, and their feedback loop doesn’t stop at the employee.

While these complaints might seem to be “employee failure alerts” that a line employee might want to hide from their manager, they often point out where management needs to provide better support and/or infrastructure to their staff.

Without complaint awareness, it can be difficult for managers to see trends that (going back to valuation) can be incredibly wasteful and expensive. This is particularly true when there are lots of part-time people involved across changing shifts – negating the ability to see such trends.

Communication

Many times when you file a complaint, you get a response indicating that the company isn’t staffed to respond personally to each complaint. If you can respond to each one, I suggest doing so. If you have thousands of clients and get a lot of feedback, it can be overwhelming to respond individually.

However, individual responses can often be avoided if you respond in a way that serves many. Use your website, email list or text subscriber list to discuss complaint resolution, including the actions taken. Share internally with your team as well.

Preparing your business for sale, or not.

As you get a little older, one of the natural things you start to think about is “What am I going to do with this business?” While you might find a buyer (as many do), or you plan to involve your family in some way. Anyone else might have to search for a while. While you’re considering that (family or not) and dealing with the day to day, it’s worthwhile to spend some time preparing your business for sale.

One of the ways to do that is to start thinking about what happens the day after closing. In many cases, your buyer is likely to request some sort of financing, which often comes as a revenue split payable to you. If you have to (or want to) do this, you’ll be a lot more interested in the buyer’s success.

Leaving a road map

Leaving the new owner a road map can’t hurt, no matter how experienced they are.

What roles will have to be filled to take over your business?

  • Daily operations
  • Product management and development
  • Finance
  • Infrastructure management
  • Marketing
  • Sales

You may have others, depending on your business.

What do these things involve?

Daily operations

In brief, run the business day to day, relieving the owner of all tasks. Making sure everyone on the team is communicating and is being communicated with. No mysteries, no surprises. If you had to be replaced tomorrow, what would it REALLY take?

Product management and development

Managing employees, consultants, their projects and the quality of those projects. Planning and executing testing so that quality meets or exceeds both your own and your customers’ expectations. Working out ongoing product plans, deployments and deadlines so these projects can be coordinated with other parts of the business.

Finance

Monitoring AR / renewal rate / renewal speed, keeping the bills paid, updating metrics, etc. Making sure your financial records resemble something a buyer and their people (banker, investors, etc) expect to see.

Infrastructure management

What infrastructure do you currently have to manage and care for?

Marketing

Planning, design, development, and execution of marketing efforts per your marketing calendar. What prospects are you not reaching? Are there prospects who need what you do, but simply aren’t exposed to your company because of (what, exactly)? When you have churn, what is the cause? When someone declines to purchase, what are the reasons? The answers to these questions change over time, so they must be asked on a recurring basis. This includes lost customer re-acquisition.

Sales

Improve, manage and document the sales process. If there isn’t one now, develop one. It’s “easy” to take a company to two times current revenue by doing more of what you’re doing now, the same way you’re doing it now – throw “bodies” at it. However, it’s all but impossible to 10X a company that way.

Investigate expansion into adjacent markets

Are there closely adjacent spaces you aren’t yet addressing? Do the people that work with the people who work with your products and services all day need your help in a way that relates to your existing business?

Identification of partner and cross-marketing opportunities

Investigate partnering and cross-marketing opportunities where you can leverage your reach to help your partner and where your partner can do the same for you.

Standardize and organize company finances

Investors, angels and prospective buyers expect (hope) to find well-organized finances in forms they’re used to seeing. I don’t mean to say that your finances aren’t organized now (are they?), but they may need to be more formalized. What you want is something that wouldn’t raise concerns when an investor and their professional finance team sees them. Being able to provide such numbers to them on relatively short notice sends a message.

Other benefits of preparing your business for sale

Everything here is about ultimately about preparing for exit. That doesn’t mean that you aren’t focused on customers, in fact, it means just the opposite.

Everything you do to prepare a company for sale prepares it to withstand market challenges, slow months or quarters, while also making it more attractive for purchase. In particular, the road map makes it easier for you to “replace yourself” in the event you decide not to sell and instead, decide to become a passive owner.

No matter what direction you go, making the business stronger benefits you and the new owner.

Newspaper ad revenue vs Facebook ad revenue

This graph comparing Facebook ad revenue vs newspaper ad revenue appeared over the Thanksgiving weekend.

As a small business owner, here are a few things to factor into your reaction to this data:

1) Graphs like this can be misleading when there is one media (Facebook) in serious growth mode vs. an entire market. We’re talking about a large market of diverse sized newspaper businesses where many of this group still don’t get the internet, still don’t get direct marketing, don’t have the ability to target subscribers based on income and other demographics (much less psychographics), and still don’t coach their advertisers to place ads that produce results. There are some who do get those things and who are focused on producing results for their clients (versus “How many $ of ads can we sell this week?”), but they seem to be a minority. Be careful not to paint the entire newspaper industry as a monolithic dinosaur that cannot deliver solid leads to you. Some papers fit that description, and some don’t.

2) The volume of Facebook ad revenue vs. U.S. newspaper ad revenue as a whole doesn’t mean you much to you IF your newspaper ads are working. Remember, what works FOR YOU is what matters, not what a pundit says, and not what the average says about an entire market across the whole country. Do what works. Do what you can dominate at. Monitor constantly. Keep in mind that a substantial piece of the drop in newspaper ad spend is due to classifieds going to online markets such as Craigslist.

3) If you aren’t already using Facebook ads, perhaps it is time to reconsider them – no matter how solid the results are from your newspaper campaigns. Wearing blinders is dangerous, so don’t get caught napping because your current newspaper ads are producing well.  Like every lead source you use, you have to watch your newspaper ad production closely to make sure that it’s still hitting your cost per lead requirements. If newspaper lead performance falls off, you’ll need to keep a close eye on the customer value of those leads.

4) The graph is a little old because some of it appears to be based on 2014 newspaper data. The advance of Facebook ad spend has likely increased since that time. An April 2016 eMarketer piece indicated Facebook was on track for $22B in global ad sales for 2016. See #3.

A well-armed minutiae: Urgent, not important.

Yes, I said “minutiae”, not “militia”. The similarity and power of these two words struck me, so I thought I’d substitute one for the other. One of the most dangerous things in your (and your team’s) day to day productivity is the “crisis of the unimportant”. IE: tasks that seem important only because someone interrupted you with them. Minutiae are the little things that, left uncontrolled, will consume your day and leave it unfulfilling, perhaps annoying and almost certainly empty of substantive accomplishments. Stephen Covey spent his career preaching about preventing these tasks from consuming your day – categorizing them as “urgent, not important”.

Eliminate minutiae with systems

As the owner or a senior manager, it’s critical to get out of the “interrupt me early and often” mode as soon as you can – but that doesn’t mean you can ignore the needs of those who interrupt you. You simply need to find a way to deal with them and set boundaries for them. A system helps.

Back in the days of Photo One, photography studio owners asked me to solve this problem for them. To the studio shooter, the most valuable revenue-creation time was in the camera room – ie: behind the camera time with the client in a room full of props, lights and other tools of the studio photographer. When they’re in that room with a client, the value they’re creating can create revenue for years, so the last thing they want to happen once they have “warmed up” the subject is to have the rapport / groove interrupted by someone asking where the coffee filters are, or how to process a refund for a charge split across two cards, or similar.

One answer to this is a system that provides answers to “interruption questions”. A studio owner told me that they had an answer / procedures book to deal with this, but they didn’t like the maintenance headache that it caused. This book predated Google docs and wikis, so they edited everything in Microsoft Word (or similar) and then printed the answers / procedures and put them in a three-ring binder.

The process established in the studio was to consult the book if you didn’t know the answer, then ask your manager and only then could the shooter in the camera room be interrupted. That interruption was OK only if it couldn’t wait until the camera room appointment was over. Obviously, this becomes a training issue at first so that the proper habits are established. Beyond that point, the book should get updated with one-off requests quickly so that camera room interruptions fall off quickly.

Make sure your minutiae cure is scalable

The studio owner came to me because they had a big studio and one book wasn’t enough. They needed multiple copies, but managing all the changes was a chore. Since most of the users were lusing Photo One all day, it made perfect sense to include the equivalent of “the answer book” within our software. That allowed anyone to get to it, plus the answer book functionality in the software allowed them to print a copy of the book so there were always printed copies available.

Resources like this can provide answers to questions, as well as step by step checklists or processes that allow the owner and managers to get things done the way they want, even if they aren’t available. One memorable example was “How to arm the alarm at end of day”. Do this wrong and you have no security or incorrect security. Do it right and the owner / manager gets some slack and the employee builds confidence in their ability to close the shop for the day.

A wiki, a FAQ, anything

These days, a custom desktop software feature like that really isn’t necessary because it’s so easy to build something like this into the private side of your company’s website as an internal wiki or frequently-asked-questions (FAQ) page. These assets are valuable not only for managers and your subject matter experts (SME) who get interrupted by such questions, but also for new employees or temps who come into your shop and need a resource other than “Ask Jennifer” umpteen times per week.

The last time I started getting overwhelmed by these things, I started writing down the context of the interruptions. That allowed me to see trends, identify what needed to be documented and get out of interruptionville.