Burgers are Personal

Anytime I see a good example of how to turn ordinary into pretty darned cool (and personal), I like to share it.

A Burger King in Brazil took their customer’s photos and printed the photos on the paper used to wrap their burger. Their point was to emphasize that there was some meat to corporate’s “Have it your way” slogan – and this does exactly that.

What could make your burger more personal than having your face on the wrapper?

If you and your staff discussed this during a meeting, it’s likely that you’d come up with 100 different reasons to do something else (or nothing).

I suspect the management of this Burger King had the same thoughts – but they did it anyway. Kudos to them.

How can you make your business more personal to your customers?

Tiffany is known for the little blue box. Mercedes is known for luxury, but the luxury doesn’t stop with their cars. It extends to their relationship with their owners with a litany of personal touches. Disney has guests, not customers – and treats them like guests.

What would Tiffany, Mercedes or Disney do if they owned your business?

5 thoughts on “Burgers are Personal”

  1. The personal touch is critical in business. Think of every personal interaction you have with any other person is a seed you’ve planted for potential future business. The person you just met in the checkout at the supermarket or a networking meeting may not be in need of your services. However, by making a good impression, you may find that they pass your name on to someone who does!

    Your client’s (or potential client’s) favourite tea, the fact that John from Company X is a vegetarian, the names of Client Y’s children – all of these personal touches make the people around you feel good – about themselves
    .-= Kate Beardmore´s last blog ..Not posh enough for a PA? =-.

  2. Thanks! I accidentally cut myself off – that final point should be:

    … all of these personal touches make the people around you feel good – about themselves and about YOU. Make yourself memorable and you’ll never be short of business.
    .-= Kate Beardmore´s last blog ..Not posh enough for a PA? =-.

  3. Hi Mark,

    Agreed. A personal touch helps separate you from your competition. It moves your business away from ‘sales’ and more towards ‘personal relationships’. This is hard for big business to achieve, as it only takes one employee to let it down. Just think… how successful would that Whopper campaign be if the employee delivering it didn’t smile, was overly slow or was rude?
    .-= David Moloney´s last blog ..Positioning: The Brand Personality For Your Small Business =-.

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