What halftime advice would you give your staff?

If you look back at recent comeback victories in sports, you have to wonder about the halftime advice those teams received. In Super Bowl 51, the Patriots were down 21-3, yet came back to win. The second half performance of both teams looked nothing like their performance in the first half. What did it take in the locker room to get the Patriots to turn that around? What was said in the Falcons locker room? After weeks of preparation, what can be said and done in 20 minutes that can radically turn around the performance of a team of professionals to such a degree that they overwhelm another team of professionals?

Halftime isn’t just about comebacks. It’s a chance to review and adjust, which we all should be doing after a positive or negative outcome to most business activities. For a football team ahead by a lot (as the Falcons were), what has to be said to prevent that sort of letdown? Teams come into halftimes needing to be reminded that they deserve to be there, that they can come back, that they are capable of doing what got them there, and that each individual is a piece of something bigger.

It’s no different in your business. The concept of a game’s halftime doesn’t necessarily align well with the events on the timeline of a company’s life, but that doesn’t matter. There are always turning points in projects, products, careers, marketing campaigns, etc. Projects and products both have natural “halftimes”. They look like points in time where it makes sense to stop, assess, adjust and re-engage.

Team and company are interchangeable concepts. Whether teams win or lose, the best ones get together afterward to review what happened, both positive and negative, and what can be learned. Military units review after action reports (AAR) for the same reason. They ask the question: “How can we improve upon what just happened?” regardless of whether it was good or bad.

Looking back to Lombardi

Every Vince Lombardi speech covers fundamentals. He knew he was dealing with professionals. Their performance occurs at a level most never reach. They see and understand parts of the game that amateurs and “mere TV viewers” cannot. For the very best, the game “slows down” as if everyone else moves in slow motion so they are able to arrive at a critical location on the field with perfect timing. Lombardi knew this, yet repeatedly returned to fundamentals.

Is there a lesson in that for your team? Do your best staffers remember and execute fundamental behaviors more frequently than everyone else?

What halftime advice do you give a team who had a great month?

Your team had a great month. Now what?

What changed month-over-month that made last month so great? What performances stood out as the keys to making that happen? What short list of behaviors or tactics can be identified that were essential to the month’s outcome? What should be focused on so that your team can reproduce that performance? Who learned something that they leveraged into a successful outcome? Who stopped doing something and noticed an improvement as a result? What systemic changes can we implement to make this month’s success more easily reproducible?

What halftime advice do you give a team who had a bad month?

Your team had a terrible month. Now what?

What historically key success behaviors are still valid and were not achieved last month? What happened that threw us off our game? How do we correct those things? What systemic changes can be made to automatically prevent those problems from reoccurring? Who needs help meeting performance expectations? Who needs a mentor? Who needs coaching? What fundamental behaviors fell off last month and need to be improved? How can we remind each team member of fundamentals that we assume will be performed? What distracted us this month? Has everyone’s performance fallen off, or only certain groups?

Call a timeout

Halftime provides a natural break in the action to reflect, assess, adjust and re-engage. For a company, use them like a timeout. When things aren’t heading in the right direction, don’t wait. Call a timeout. Step in, discuss what’s going wrong (and well), share what you’ve learned, advise and re-engage. Are the staffers who are failing following the plan? Are the staffers who are succeeding following the plan? Is the plan failing?

Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usaghumphreys/

Would your employees recommend your company?

While listening to recruiter Bob Beaudine‘s Entreleadership podcast this week, some comments he made about recruiting and networking suddenly mixed themselves together. When your company is looking for new people to fill positions, do your employees recommend your company to their friends and family?

While such recruiting would be dependent on whether or not your friends and family are qualified to do the work, in many companies, that isn’t a problem. When a company needs a receptionist, mechanic, manager, or salesperson – there’s almost always someone in your circle of family and friends who could be interested in that opportunity.

Question is, do your employees recommend your company? I suspect you’d be interested in hearing what they might say to a friend or family member about their work and their employer. Chances of you hearing that verbatim are probably not good, yet it’s something worth pursuing.

Make it easier to recommend your company

Put together a brochure, something on letterhead or a web page that elaborates on why you encourage employees to recruit friends and family. Your reasons for encouraging this may resonate with your team. For example, you wouldn’t expect an employee to recommend someone who won’t reflect well on them. If they will be working together (something to be careful about), you wouldn’t expect an employee to recommend someone they’ll have to carry or that they can’t depend on.

Rather than leaving that unsaid, discuss it in your recruiting communications and in staff meetings. Make it clear that you understand that employees aren’t going to recommend someone they don’t trust and believe in. Be sure your employees understand that their recommendation is a function of their reputation in the company. Not only will this likely make the employees more selective about who they recommend, it will also reinforce your belief in them and in who they recruit.

What if they aren’t recommending your company

If your employees aren’t actively reaching out to friends and family to suggest they apply for openings, there may be good reasons. Some folks don’t like to combine their work and personal lives. That may seem a little odd to company owners, but it is your employees’ choice. However, if you see or know of your employees socializing outside of work, then it’s unlikely that combining work and personal lives is a concern. For those employees who mix socially, do you get recommendations for job candidates from their friends and family? Presumably this would come out in interviews or recommendations, so you would know most of the time.

Find a way to ask your employees why they aren’t recommending that their friends and family apply for work at your place. You may need to make this confidential – there are easy to use online survey tools that can help.

Of course, there are legitimate reasons why an employee wouldn’t recruit friends and family. I would be wary of suggesting that both people in a couple work for the same company, particularly if the company isn’t on very solid financial ground. The last thing a couple needs is for both of them to be worried about losing their job, or worse, having it happen to both of them at the same time.

Whether or not your staff recommends the company to friends and family, it’s worth discussing with them. Focus on the employees who will be frank with you. You need someone to tell you want you need to hear, even if you don’t want to hear it. Be sure they know that you won’t hassle or punish them for their comments – but you may ask for their help. You want honest feedback. If your staff wouldn’t recommend your company, you need to know why.

They need to understand that the lack of recommendations is serious, and that you want them to share with impunity. That doesn’t grant a free pass to be mean-spirited, rude, or abusive – and you should advise them of that in advance. Communicating bad news properly is an important life skill. Done poorly, this discussion will be tough for an owner to forgive and forget. What you don’t want is information presented in a way that will derail the goal: the need to learn what’s holding back their recommendation to others. Remember, the reasons they don’t recommend you are probably the reasons people leave.

Hire for commitment over ego

The difference between a strong business leader and a weak one is easily detected: Who do they surround themselves with – and why? Do they hire for commitment or ego? Time and time again, you can see examples in business where a business owner surrounded themselves with one of three kinds of people:

The kind of people who will agree with everything the owner says or proposes, almost (if not never) disagrees with the owner, and when cornered, will err on the side of silence or “I’m undecided” rather than taking a stand that might later prove to disagree with the boss.

  • The group who will say little or nothing when they disagree with the owner.
  • The group who will make decisions independently, regardless of the owner’s stance / position, and aren’t inclined to hide that from the owner.
  • The group who will make decisions independently, regardless of the owner’s stance / position, but aren’t willing to offend / rile the owner by stating their disagreement.
  • The group who will disagree with the owner’s choices and decisions no matter how valid – simply because they’re the owner.

There are probably a few other groups / types that I missed, but this list covers the majority of what I’ve seen in the last 35 years.

Which group should you hire from?

From where I stand, neither 100% agreement or disagreement is a good thing, unless each decision is arrived at through analysis and thought. However, as we’ve all seen, some of these disagreements exist simply because they can (a minority, in my view) and others disagree because they feel the owner is making a mistake – however legitimate they feel that mistake might be. When you feel your boss the owner is about to make a mistake that could seriously affect your business, you have choices, which tend to fall into three categories:

  • You disagree, say so and make your case to your manager or the owner.
  • You disagree and say nothing.
  • You disagree and make your case to your peers.

When you hire someone, which choice would you prefer your future employee takes?

For me, it’s the first one, if you’re hiring for commitment over ego.

Making this possible is on you, the owner

So let’s say you’re on board with the whole “I welcome my staff to disagree with me as long as they’re will to discuss it” thing. It isn’t going to happen unless you create an environment that makes it clear that you appreciate it AND that disagreeing with you isn’t going to come with a cost. Saying it is rarely enough. You have to prove it. If it’s been a long time since you were an employee, you may wonder why you have to prove it, but trust me, you do. You might even have to create a situation where a reasonable (ie: calm) discussion gets started, even if you have to “stage” (pre-arrange) the start of the conversation. It might seem a little disingenuous to plan a discussion like this and arrange for someone to disagree with you, but it’s THAT important to show everyone that you’re willing to engage in such a discussion. You need to say and show that it’s ok to disagree with you. You will also need to find a way to communicate that it’s not OK to be a jerk when you disagree with the owner, but otherwise, it’s OK to do so.

Once the discussion is done, it’s also critical that you follow up both privately and publicly. After you’ve had time to reconsider your discussion given the input you received during the disagreement discussion, call the person into your office – and do so that it’s obvious you’ve called them in. Discuss with them what your decision is, whether you changed your mind or not. Explain to them what their comments made you reconsider and how they impacted any other work you’re dealing with. If they changed your mind, explain why. Either way, be sure that they know that the risk they took in front of everyone was zero risk and had a return on investment: You recognize that they have the best interests of the company at heart (commitment) when they publicly disagreed with you and that you appreciate it.

Hiring for commitment over ego means hiring someone who is willing to take a stand because they feel it’s best for the company.

Structure becomes infrastructure

A couple of weeks ago, we discussed the value of checklists. Checklists provide an obvious memory support mechanism and a sequence of events for work processes, but their value extends beyond that. They’re one of many tools you can use to provide structure to work processes, a comforting “I’ve got your back” to new employees or employees new to a role. In addition, they’re a means of creating some standardization of what you do. While your team doesn’t need these things for the same reason that a young child benefits from a structured life, the benefits to your business are at least as important. Structure becomes infrastructure.

Better information

Structure can take many forms in your business. A simple example is a gain in structure when you move from a cigar box to a cash register. Likewise, when you replace the simple cash register with one that’s integrated with your customer relationship management (CRM) system. These improvements increase your ability to share information and leverage it when making decisions of all kinds. Normally a CRM is viewed as a tool for sales and marketing, yet the organization that it brings to transactional data tends to improve service and your company’s understanding of client needs. Any time you can integrate data from multiple parts of the company, you’re almost certain to make the data more valuable. Put simply, having more complete information should yield better decisions.

That transaction data now takes on a behavioral component, since you’re better equipped to recognize order / re-order patterns, capacity expectations and the like. Seems like a sales thing on the surface, and to an extent it is. When you are the business who knows exactly when to refill a client’s supply of a critical component of their business, the trust and comfort level with you improves.

Clients will recognize this and start to depend on your routine fulfillment – whatever that means for your relationship with them. Whether it’s a load of sand, a dozen bags of coffee, or a courier pickup – when they see a consistent, timely behavior develop, they’ll start to depend on as if it’s part of their own infrastructure. Eventually, they’ll build upon it. That’s not just sales – it’s service. While it may seem like a little thing to know that your coffee cup is always refilled in time, that same type of fulfillment isn’t a little thing – it’s worth time and money to your clients. You become part of their business – and perhaps a part that would be increasingly painful to replace.

Being painful and time-consuming to replace is a good goal, but don’t take advantage of it. Being ingrained in their business is sufficient advantage. Don’t make it the kind of pain of change that they’ll suffer simply to gain the pleasure of getting rid of you.

What tools and/or processes can you wrap around your existing checklists and other means of process control to make them more valuable? What two systems, tools or processes can you integrate to make each more valuable? Your people are often the best resource of this info. They’re in the trenches every day and frequently have just the insights needed to make their work more productive, more valuable and more efficient.

But you have to ask.

What structure isn’t

It isn’t control, at least in a negative form. Structure changes that increase your ability to get, stay and be organized are often looked upon as ways of increasing control and decreasing employees’ ability to use their imagination and creativity. While that’s possible, those are what I consider the wrong kinds of structure. Be sure your team understands the benefits you hope the company will gain from these changes. It’s far too easy to assume the wrong thing if you don’t tell them the intended outcome.

Tools and processes that increase the level of organization free your people to expend their energy on the things that require their intelligence and experience. If you use structure to control them and limit their ability to create and deliver solutions – you’re cheating yourself and your clients. Unless the controls you’re putting in place are intended to reduce / detect internal theft or similar problems, I suggest discussing proposed improvements with your staff so you are aware of possible downsides that you may not be aware of. Finally, deployment always benefits from front line feedback and of course, testing.

A well-armed minutiae: Urgent, not important.

Yes, I said “minutiae”, not “militia”. The similarity and power of these two words struck me, so I thought I’d substitute one for the other. One of the most dangerous things in your (and your team’s) day to day productivity is the “crisis of the unimportant”. IE: tasks that seem important only because someone interrupted you with them. Minutiae are the little things that, left uncontrolled, will consume your day and leave it unfulfilling, perhaps annoying and almost certainly empty of substantive accomplishments. Stephen Covey spent his career preaching about preventing these tasks from consuming your day – categorizing them as “urgent, not important”.

Eliminate minutiae with systems

As the owner or a senior manager, it’s critical to get out of the “interrupt me early and often” mode as soon as you can – but that doesn’t mean you can ignore the needs of those who interrupt you. You simply need to find a way to deal with them and set boundaries for them. A system helps.

Back in the days of Photo One, photography studio owners asked me to solve this problem for them. To the studio shooter, the most valuable revenue-creation time was in the camera room – ie: behind the camera time with the client in a room full of props, lights and other tools of the studio photographer. When they’re in that room with a client, the value they’re creating can create revenue for years, so the last thing they want to happen once they have “warmed up” the subject is to have the rapport / groove interrupted by someone asking where the coffee filters are, or how to process a refund for a charge split across two cards, or similar.

One answer to this is a system that provides answers to “interruption questions”. A studio owner told me that they had an answer / procedures book to deal with this, but they didn’t like the maintenance headache that it caused. This book predated Google docs and wikis, so they edited everything in Microsoft Word (or similar) and then printed the answers / procedures and put them in a three-ring binder.

The process established in the studio was to consult the book if you didn’t know the answer, then ask your manager and only then could the shooter in the camera room be interrupted. That interruption was OK only if it couldn’t wait until the camera room appointment was over. Obviously, this becomes a training issue at first so that the proper habits are established. Beyond that point, the book should get updated with one-off requests quickly so that camera room interruptions fall off quickly.

Make sure your minutiae cure is scalable

The studio owner came to me because they had a big studio and one book wasn’t enough. They needed multiple copies, but managing all the changes was a chore. Since most of the users were lusing Photo One all day, it made perfect sense to include the equivalent of “the answer book” within our software. That allowed anyone to get to it, plus the answer book functionality in the software allowed them to print a copy of the book so there were always printed copies available.

Resources like this can provide answers to questions, as well as step by step checklists or processes that allow the owner and managers to get things done the way they want, even if they aren’t available. One memorable example was “How to arm the alarm at end of day”. Do this wrong and you have no security or incorrect security. Do it right and the owner / manager gets some slack and the employee builds confidence in their ability to close the shop for the day.

A wiki, a FAQ, anything

These days, a custom desktop software feature like that really isn’t necessary because it’s so easy to build something like this into the private side of your company’s website as an internal wiki or frequently-asked-questions (FAQ) page. These assets are valuable not only for managers and your subject matter experts (SME) who get interrupted by such questions, but also for new employees or temps who come into your shop and need a resource other than “Ask Jennifer” umpteen times per week.

The last time I started getting overwhelmed by these things, I started writing down the context of the interruptions. That allowed me to see trends, identify what needed to be documented and get out of interruptionville.

Decisions with numbers

Business is Personal” has been a thing for almost 12 years now. While many things have changed in that 12 years, the nature and impact of good and bad decisions remains the same: the difference between success and failure.

“So says Captain Obvious”, you might say. Perhaps, yet your decisions continue to be the single most powerful (or weakest), positive (or worst) impact you can have on your company and your team.

The information and process you use to arrive at those decisions makes all the difference.

Demonizing the numbers

On a number of occasions, I have suggested that you start gathering metrics – even if you start with a single number and a yellow pad. Your data gathering might be more sophisticated than that, but it won’t matter if you aren’t using the data to make decisions.

It’s easy to demonize the numbers. They make it easy to make “impersonal” decisions, right? They tell us that Marta (who has only been here for two years) is producing twice as much as Jenny with fewer quality problems. Yet Jenny has been here for 10 years and must be loyal to the company.

The impersonal numbers say Jenny should be sent packing, or should find another job, or should be moved to another role in the company. Should we ask her if she’s bored, or needs a new challenge or is struggling with (whatever)?

Maybe Marta has more ambition and bigger goals than Jenny, who may only be here for the paycheck and is happy as long as that continues. Or maybe Jenny doesn’t realize her volume and quality are down and would change whatever is necessary to improve her numbers if the data told her about the problems.

Numbers don’t lie and don’t care about circumstances. They’re demonized because they seem to provoke decisions to be made without regard for the people impacted by them.

Data provokes questions. Is the data misinterpreted? Is there more to the story about why Jenny’s volume and quality are down? Is the data incomplete? Is the analysis incomplete? Like any tool, metrics can be used badly.

Ignore some of the numbers at your peril

The data indicating Jenny’s apparent lack of productivity and quality might be affected by the machinery she’s using. Is her equipment operating at full speed?

Do the metrics take into account that she is the subject matter expert in her department? Does whoever evaluates the numbers know that thanks to new hires in the last quarter, much of Jenny’s time is spent training new employees on her equipment?

Do the metrics reflect that her machine was down for 12 hours last week and that while her machine was down, she made service calls to pick up the slack for a sick staff member?

You want to know these things when you make a decision about Jenny’s performance numbers.

Decisions are personal and impersonal?

What data often does is reinforce decisions that you’re afraid or unwilling to make. Sometimes data tells you things you weren’t the least bit aware of, but be sure that these surprises are well-researched. There are often multiple factors affecting a single metric, and some are not always obvious.

When the numbers are ignored, decisions are delayed or not made at all because of a personal bias or a desire to avoid “hurting” someone. Meanwhile, the numbers keep telling you what you need to know to make the decision that’s best for the everyone.

When complete, a metric provides you with the information needed to make decisions based on what’s really happening in your company. Yet almost all decisions are personal to someone. How do we make personal and impersonal decisions at the same time?

We don’t.

Even if the decisions aren’t personal, the impacts usually are. Make sure the data used to make a decision tells the whole story. Make sure that both the directly and indirectly impacted understand the context of the decision. You might feel these things are none of the employees’ business, but that breeds the attitude that they shouldn’t care because, after all, it’s none of their business.

If the decision is best for everyone at the company, show them why. You’re responsible for making the company as productive, profitable, secure, and resilient as possible. Your decisions should reflect that.

Employee metrics and the fantasy football parallel

My son and his friends talked me into joining their NFL fantasy league this season. A fantasy team owner “drafts” players and those players’ statistics are used to score points each week. You face off against one other team owner in the league. The owner whose players score the most points that week determines who wins. It struck me this week that gathering good employee metrics, monitoring them and taking action on the data is not unlike what you do when managing a fantasy sports team.

The last time I played a fantasy sport, the draft involved Larry Bird and Magic Johnson. It was 1986. Getting statistics for every game was laborious. You had to scour the newspaper to get the data you needed and for NBA basketball, it became a daily chore due to the volume of games. In a lot of ways, the difficulty of getting a player’s game statistics for every game for a fantasy sport 30 years ago reminds me of the difficulty of gathering the right employee metrics these days. For some data, you really have to want it.

Employee metrics should include condition

In the NFL and other professional sports, there are well-defined rules and timelines for determining whether or not a player can play, communicating their condition and deciding their availability for the next game. Scrutiny on professional sports players is very high and the data is readily available, so it’s easy to determine if a player is injured, will play this week, has the flu, is dealing with a family member’s illness or death, etc.

In your business, things are not that simple. While you’ll know about an employee family member’s death, you won’t often learn about an employee’s family drama or relative’s illness until it has progressed to a state that impacts the employee’s ability to show up at work. The impact starts well before you find out about the situation.

Sometimes it isn’t sickness. Employment situations change. Kids move back home, or go off to college, or both. Weddings, divorces, financial and legal struggles and other things can put stress on an employee, even if those things aren’t their life changes. When these things happen to an employee’s child, parent or sibling, they can affect work performance, whether they like it or not.

In the NFL, a player has to go through the concussion protocol after “getting their bell rung“. They must be cleared to play football by someone who is not associated with the team. While it’s mostly about caring for the player’s condition and their future health, it also has a big impact on the team. In the old days, a player could brush aside such concerns and play anyway. Sometimes this helped the team, sometimes not.

Your employees have the same types of issues. Who is monitoring their condition? Are the people you have “on the field” in optimal condition for the task? These things are a form of metrics, but they’re difficult to gather / measure. What would help them return to their normal performance level or better?

Typical business metrics say a lot of about day to day performance, but don’t lose sight of more personal “metrics” that can affect employee performance.

Who’s the opponent?

In a NFL fantasy league, who you “play” that week is very much determined on which team they are playing. The quality of the opponent is everything. The best quarterback in the league isn’t likely to have a huge game against the best defense in the league. To score higher, you might shift to a quarterback who’s playing against a poor defense this week.

In your shop or office, the opponent may be a work task, the sales prospect, or that meeting with partners. While you probably don’t think of them as opponents, the same ideas apply. Given the situation, task, and people involved, do you have the best available players on the field? In other words, are the right people involved?

What’s the history with those people, tasks, and situations? Does that impact who you assign to the job? Pro teams practice against an opponent’s “look” the week before they play that opponent. How do you test your team in advance of the real thing?

Metrics are situational, behavioral and yes, hard numbers too.

Which little things do you let slide?

We often let little things go because we have “bigger fish to fry”. We prioritize tasks, clients, products and services over others of the same sort because we have to. Prioritization of what’s important today over what might be important tomorrow, or even later today is perfectly normal. We have to do it.

The challenge with little things is that they add up, particularly when they’re repeatedly set aside. They have a way of ganging up and creating momentum, as if they were a colony of ants. Together, a colony can move things much larger than any single ant.

We cannot allow any error in judgment to delude us into thinking that ‘letting the little thing slide’ would not make a major difference.” – Jim Rohn

What little things?

What sort of little things come to mind for you as important for your business?

For me, the little things that matter are those things that tell me what the business thinks is important. Every business says the customer is important, but how do they prove it? Do their words match their actions? Little things are a great place to sort this out.

Little things explicitly communicate what’s important to the owners of the business. They tell me about the culture of the business and paint a picture of what’s important to the business’ management team. These things indicate how hard the ownership and management has thought about what their customers need, want and expect.

Their consideration of and emphasis placed on these things is reflected in the staff’s behavior. Their behavior is an indicator of the quality of management. It signals management’s emphasis during staff training, as well as the quality and frequency of that training. All of this points at the importance placed on serving their clients’ needs, wants and expectations.

Think about the curb appeal of a house. Consider your impression when stopping in front of a home with a weedy, un-mowed yard. Now think about the impression you have when viewing a nicely manicured one. What does that tell you about the upkeep, maintenance and care taken for the rest of each home? Your impression might be wrong – but changing that impression is tough. A business with poor “curb appeal” may never get a chance to improve the impression they’ve left.

That’s exactly what little things can do. They have a knack for sending a big message to your clients.

Prioritization by impact

Big things matter. If you think back over your career, I’m sure you can think of a number of big issues that started out as little things that were left to fester. But which ones? It’s critical to separate the little unimportant things from the little things that can fester into big ones. And how exactly do you do that? One of the most important prioritization skills you can develop is the ability to determine which of these little things are unimportant and which need to be dealt with before they create big problems.

I tend to look at the impact, rather than the size.

If something small is likely to impact a number of people, it won’t be small for long. That’s the kind of little thing that requires short term attention. Little things to you, your team and your business might be big things to your clientele, which speaks to your awareness of client needs, wants and expectations.

If something small isn’t communicated, it can become something big simply by not letting your clients know about it – and know that you’re aware of it. Even if you believe it’s a little thing, communicate anyway. This gives the client a chance to say “Thanks, no problem” or “Hey, it’s not a big deal in and of itself, but it’s going to create another problem that causes a big impact.” The incremental cost of that brief advisory to the client is tiny. The return on investment on that communication can be sizable if it helps keep a small issue from morphing into something ugly.

If you only identify one of these situations per year and it results in keeping a client you might have lost, the return on investment is obvious. If you retain one sale a month by categorizing these little things and taking action on the important ones, the return on investment is obvious.

Teamwork means… what?

Teamwork has been on my mind a bit lately, so I thought I’d organize a few thoughts along those lines.

Trust is leadership is influence

Every day of your life, people are doing a credit check on you…your trust
– Rick Warren

People learn to trust you when you are predictable. When they can predict how you will handle a situation, how you will care for a client, how you will advise or comfort an employee, how you will discipline an employee – as well as when or where, and how you will call out an employee for a solid or above the call effort.

Think about that not only regarding your service to clients, but your service to your team. What example do you set for other employees? How do you talk about clients when clients aren’t around? How do you talk about other employees when they aren’t around?

People trust those who are loyal to them. Loyalty demonstrated in others is often assumed to be the same loyalty one thinks they’re getting when they aren’t around. Loyalty doesn’t mean being soft. It means being consistent, predictable and thinking of everyone – including but not solely the company and its owner(s) in every decision and action.

Life’s battery isn’t self-sustaining

Remember, the employee’s job is one of many things attached to their “life battery”. Work, home, kids, spouse and many other things compete for and/or charge/consume the energy in that battery.

If everything is taking energy from the battery and no investment is made in recharging the battery, how long will it last?

I don’t have the right to be tired” – reality show producer Mark Burnett, meaning that he doesn’t have the right not to take care of himself.

You can probably identify things that drain your battery. Can you also point to the things done daily or weekly that recharge it? What helps your team recharge? Does your team know what saps your battery? Let them know. For me, drama and the inability to get focus time are major battery leaks.

Teamwork, motivation and ownership

Don’t expect every staff member to work at the same level all the time. Different work motivates at different levels. Energy levels swell and fade. You and other team members can impact the performance of others more easily than you think.

Don’t expect employees to care as much as you do, work as long as you do, work as hard as you do, or live and breathe your business like you do. Some will, but most won’t because they don’t own the place. For you, it’s an investment in your lifetime financial future. What is it for them? What have you done to make it more than a paycheck for them? Perhaps you have some sort of employee ownership program, but it has to be real or it may as well not exist. Employee owners have a skin in the game and they will view things differently as a result, just as you did before you were a business owner. Don’t expect people to act like an owner if they aren’t.

When team members show an interest in learning new things or deepening their expertise or skills, it’s not enough to get out of the way. Do what you can to help them get a running start. You can pay for the education, reimburse upon success, make time in their day for it, and find other ways to leverage their enthusiasm and interest. No matter what you do, don’t discourage it.

Affirmation and Appreciation

Management of mistakes is important. Perseverance, determination and endurance combine to create wins, but mistakes teach us what doesn’t work. How we recognize, debrief and analyze them to avoid repeat episodes is critical.

Make at least weekly contact with everyone. I don’t mean a wave or a smile in the shop, but a few moments or a pre-arranged chat, email or text conversation about the Weekly Four:

  1. I’ve made progress on …
  2. I’m having a problem with ….
  3. I need a decision from you about ….
  4. My goal(s) this week is ….

Keep in mind that presumption isn’t communication. Assuming that an employee knows that their long/late hours lately are appreciated isn’t appreciation. Be explicit to them and their family. A short handwritten note to the family to recognize their effort and the family’s sacrifice is more than a thank you.

What does teamwork look like to you?

Micromanagement… is there a cure?

What is micromanagement? I suspect everyone who experiences it has their own definition. Wikipedia describes it as “micromanagement is a management style whereby a manager closely observes or controls the work of subordinates or employees. Micromanagement generally has a negative connotation.

Closely observes or controls” could be good or bad, depending on the context. It’s a tricky thing but like some other creations, we tend to know it when we see it, or experience it. One person might say “closely observes” is good management and that “controls” is necessary when training new people or people in new roles, but experienced people might feel that controls is unnecessary. Is your waffle detection alarm going off yet? Good. Look, it’s clear that there will be differing opinions on this, particularly between managers and employees who naturally have different perspectives. I don’t expect that to change, but how we view these things can change, even if we aren’t able to “cure” it.

If we look at micromanagement like a cold or flu that we want to cure, we’ll naturally focus on the cause and on symptoms. We focus on symptoms to make life easier until a cure is found, and we focus on the cause because the origin can often tell us how to solve (or cure) the problem.

What causes micromanagement?

I don’t think there’s any one cause. Based on experience, research and discussions with a number of people, there are four things that I’ve heard as reasons why micromanagement is taking place (noting that managers rarely acknowledge it) :

  • Lack of data.
  • Lack of trust.
  • Lack of control.
  • Previous delivery failures.

If you look at that list, what you’ll probably read from it is that someone is frustrated. That someone is management. The things management does out of frustration with these things will almost certainly cause frustration among employees.

It’s important to understand the people we’re working with: entrepreneurs. One of the things that entrepreneurs seek when starting a business is control. Control over income, destiny, time, etc. With success comes an eventual realization that the entrepreneur can’t do it all. Success means that the entrepreneur’s business has to grow and hire people, or it has to stop growing – something that rarely pleases entrepreneurs.

Must. Have. Control.

The minute you hire people, there’s a loss of control. The entrepreneur is now a business owner, not just an entrepreneur doing and controlling it all. “Suddenly” they have to trust someone else to do what they do well. When your neighbor takes over your BBQ chef role at the quarterly neighborhood block party, letting go is difficult. This is no different.

Years later, it’s no different for the entrepreneur. The work of the business reflects upon the entrepreneur personally. The entrepreneur’s inability to know and control everything is a difficult beast to overcome, particularly if the business grows to a point where they no longer has the ability to “know” every employee personally. When the entrepreneur no longer hires every employee, another phase of this process takes place.

So what to do?

A prescription

How do we deal with the four causes?

Lack of data – A lack of information brings assumptions. Assumptions usually don’t go how you expect, so that leads to …

Lack of trust – Trust might seem like the wrong word here, but that’s likely what it feels like to the employee. Trust is built by publishing plans, milestones, deadlines and then HITTING THEM.

Lack of control
– Much of this comes down to treating the entrepreneur’s lack of control. It may be new to them or not, but feeding the other parts of this helps provide the opportunity to analyze how things are going at a high level, ask if any help is needed without having to drill down into the nitty gritty on every little thing for every project you have in progress – what most employees would view as micromanagement at a company of 20, 50, or 100 employees.

Previous delivery failures – When projects fail or are late, lack of data about the cause of failure leads to assumptions (and the cycle continues).

The big thing about this is freeing the entrepreneur to wear the CEO hat. No one else can do that work. If the entrepreneur can’t get to it because of time spent micromanaging, that’s not good. Help them escape the micromanagement trap by providing the data they need.