Your backups are worthless

Last week, we discussed that business owners do a good job of protecting their business assets – except for work-in-process and data. While I could one-off any number of work-in-process situations, doing that in a vacuum isn’t particularly effective. I can, however, cover some common steps for making backups of your data that anyone can work from.

Backups don’t matter if…

Backups don’t matter if you can’t restore from them. That’s what makes them worthless. I once encountered a financial services client whose backup tape had not been written to for over five months. Meaning: They couldn’t have recovered any of the contracts, loan documents and other paperwork that had been processed for at least five months. Even worse, the tape was bad, so even the five month old backups were unusable. Their financial / account data was housed off-site, so it was not at risk. Even so, having no backups of those files could have put them at serious risk if a hardware failure occurred.

The take home: It’s important to check your backups to make sure they succeeded and to attempt a practice recovery on those files on a regular basis. If you can’t restore a backup, the time taken to make the backup is wasted and your business data is unprotected.

Don’t forget your website

While the next portion of this pertains specifically to WordPress, the steps and justification for the steps I’m about to recommend also apply to other web-based content systems – such as Drupal, Wix, Joomla, etc. These systems are popular because they allow you to build and maintain a nice site without an expensive custom programming job. According to research done by non-WordPress researchers, WordPress is used on 27% of web sites.

In February 2017, a WordPress bug related to their new REST API was fixed and rolled out. While WordPress fixed the bug quickly, they waited only a week after the bug fix was available before publicly revealing the details of the most severe part of the bug. Legit or otherwise, any delay in updating WordPress on sites that use it made a WordPress site subject to this hack. Within hours of revealing the previously mentioned details, the volume of hack attempts using this bug escalated into the millions of attempts over a few days. In a few days from Feb 6th through Feb 10th, over a million WordPress sites had been defaced. Fortunately, the defacing was easy to reverse.

While the flaw was on WordPress, it’s a painful reminder to keep your WordPress-based site updated. You can tell WordPress to auto-update itself, as well as themes and plugins. Despite the availability of auto-update functionality, only 37% of the many millions of WordPress sites are up to date, according to data published by WordPress.org.

In addition, replace or remove plugins that aren’t updated and tested regularly. Many once-popular plugins are no longer maintained. They may continue to work, but any security vulnerabilities in the plugin(s) won’t get fixed. Any security problems will be there until you stop using the plugin. Bottom line – Not worth the risk.

Finally, protect yourself against the cretins who do this kind of stuff. I recommend a combination of the free Sucuri security plugin and the paid WordFence plugin. The latter tool provides a flexible set of tools to block people from your site – including the ability to block users by country. If your business has no need to interact with folks from countries known to harbor hackers, then you can prevent most access by people in that country. “Most” because IP-based geolocation technology is dependable, but not 100% perfect.

Automated and off-site

As with most things of this nature, I suggest automation. There are a number of tools you can use to automate backups for your website, whether or not the site uses a content management system like WordPress. There’s no reason to make this yet another manual task you have to do each day. As I noted above, backups are worthless if you can’t restore from them. Be sure to test your ability to restore from the backups you’re taking.

Last but not least, take a copy of the data off-location or use an online service. If your building burns, the backup media was sitting on the computer won’t help you recover. Dealing with fire or theft is tough. Losing your business data only makes it worse.

Protecting traditional assets isn’t enough

Protecting traditional assets is one of the most important duties of a business owner. You’re constantly taking steps to deal with the need to protect and maintain your assets including buildings, cash flow, receivables, furniture/fixtures/equipment (FFE), etc. You have insurance, attorneys, maintenance contracts and any number of other processes, mechanisms and protections in place to sustain the value of the things you’ve invested in, and in some cases, to keep you out of trouble.

Yet despite all that effort and all that expense, I encounter at least one sizable business leaving themselves at significant risk… every single week. However, I don’t mean about FFE and other hard assets. There are at least two other assets worth protecting – and they’re as important as the ones you spend plenty of time, effort and money protecting. While you might be able to think of other assets that need protection, I’m speaking of work-in-process and data.

How do you protect work-in-process?

Every small business knows the pain of trying to get work out the door when they’re sick or an employee has to call in sick – or quits. The smallest of businesses, such as those with no staff, have to suck it up and deal with it. Sometimes this means having to tell their client(s) that they can’t deliver on the previously predicted schedule. Even when they deliver a little bit late, it plants a seed with that client that their vendor might unintentionally put them at risk by being unable to deliver at some random time in the future. If Murphy has his way, the timing won’t be ideal.

While many businesses do cross-training, the most resource-constrained ones struggle to make the time to do so. The resource-constrained small business isn’t the exception, it’s often the rule. While you might have plans in place when losing a “key employee”, that isn’t necessarily what causes the pain. It isn’t necessarily about losing your best welder, hairstylist, millwright, programmer, salesperson or finish carpenter. What gets hurt is what they’re doing when they depart, whether the departure is permanent or temporary. Do you have people sitting around who can simply step in and take over without missing a beat?

In most cases, that isn’t reasonable.

A salesperson who has been working a deal for months is tough to replace. They’ve established rapport with the decision makers. Starting over is likely to delay closing that deal. A hairstylist has the same kind of rapport and trust established with their 20 best clients. Your best welder may not be able to take over a job that someone was doing because they are backed up, or they aren’t used to working under water, or they can’t leave town to work due to their family situation. Your best programmer is unlikely to step in and immediately do their best work on code they’ve never seen on a subject matter they might know nothing about.

There isn’t a magic wand to these kinds of problems, only hard, important work. There’s documentation, cross-training and meetings (yay!). It probably seems normal to ask your best players what they’d recommend in these situations, but don’t forget to ask everyone else so nothing is missed. Who do they think can take over? Who needs to be cross-trained? What processes need to be excruciatingly documented? Talk about it and plan for it as best you can before the uncontrollable happens.

It’s time to treat data as one of your traditional assets

I see data at risk on a regular basis. The maintenance and protection of data and computing equipment is often left to the end user – who is all but certain to have no experience in such things, or will not have the tools (or time) to do the job. I regularly hear from businesses who were held hostage by ransomware, by systems with no anti-virus, or by hardware failure. Years back, I had a bank client that hadn’t backed up in over five months. How did I know? The ONE backup tape they had was dated five months earlier. It was damaged.

Can orders be filled without order data?

People ask me how often they should backup. I usually respond with “How much work can you afford to re-do?” It isn’t a flippant question. Can you afford to pay your staff to redo everything they did last week? Yesterday? The last two hours? What delay can you afford?

Photo credit Rita Willaert

Filling cracks with automation and metrics

How many emails did you send last Tuesday? How many phone calls did you make last Thursday? How many things fell through the cracks last week or last month?

The first two are trivia until you start thinking about the time they consume compared to the return they produce.

The last one is the big one: tasks that fall in cracks, meaning you forgot to do something, or have someone else do something – like make a call to close a sale or follow up on a lead.

I’m guessing you have no idea how many things disappeared into cracks last week unless they’ve cost you business since that time. If they didn’t have a cost, does it matter? I think it does, but not for the reason you might think.

Metrics are lonely fellas

Metrics are great, until they aren’t. Their failing? Metrics tell you what happened and in some cases, what is happening, but they don’t tell you what to do next. By themselves, metrics can get lonely.

Automation can cure that by either telling you act on what’s happened (or is happening), or by doing it on your behalf with your advance permission.

You need to get metrics hitched up with automation, but not solely to get your metrics delivered regularly. While that’s certainly a very good idea, there’s more to the marriage of metrics and automation than prompt and consistent delivery.

There’s curing that crack problem.

Preventing cracks is better than fixing them

If you drive a diesel pickup, particularly one that’s chipped, tuned and so forth – you know what I mean. If you’re a tuner, you probably have an Edge or similar device monitoring exhaust temperatures and other engine information.

Those are metrics.

If you have an Edge or similar, you may even have it setup to tune your engine’s “brain” as engine metrics signal a need for something different.

The tuned diesel truck owner uses tools like this to prevent engine rebuilds while getting the best possible performance out of their truck. In a similar fashion, stock traders use automation to sell stocks when they hit stop loss points because they want to prevent portfolio rebuilds while getting the best possible performance from their investments.

Create a crack prevention system

Metric driven automation like that used by the stock trader and the tuned diesel owner can likewise keep our business fine tuned simply by making sure we’re aware of things that need to get done on a daily basis.

Simple but effective methods include making appointments for yourself and keeping reminder-enabled todo lists in your phone. Obvious? Sure, but they can be all but life saving when chaos finds its way into your week.

I use a few simple online tools to keep track of my work, but I’m always on a quest to find a way for them to nag me more intelligently. These tools help me remain responsible by making sure I get the right things done at the right time.

For example, after seven years, my Flathead Beacon editor knows he’s going to get this column from me every week, even if isn’t there on deadline day (five days before press day). When he gets to his desk on Monday (press day), he knows it’ll be there and it won’t require editing, except for rare occasions when my headline is a bit over the top.

Occasionally, 11pm Sunday arrives and the column isn’t finished. I have a reminder on my phone to tell me to get up 90 minutes early on Monday (ouch, right?) so I can get it published on time, allowing him to meet his commitments.

Here’s the crack prevention: Automation helps me meet my commitment, no matter how hectic life gets, no matter where I am. If the automation was fully data-driven, the reminder would only occur on Sundays when my column hasn’t yet been posted. Some situations will demand that level of data-driven automation. You don’t have to cut it as close as 11pm on the night before. Getting up 90 minutes early on Monday is my self-inflicted punishment / motivation not to let that happen.

Together, automation and metrics allow you to become more dependable as your business / volume grows, while still remaining independent. Don’t forget to show your team how to use automation to improve their performance.

The Pace of Change

If things have seemed a bit frenetic in your business lately, you’re not alone.

Many markets are experiencing a rapid rate of change – and in fact, the rate of change is accelerating. As a result, businesses, governments and even National Football League officials are struggling to keep up.

For example, if you watched the Super Bowl Sunday night, you could see it happen on almost every play. The offense would go into a formation, the defense would react before the play started and the offense would react to that, again, before the play started – with the quarterback changing the play or aspects of the play multiple times in the seconds before the ball is hiked.

Ask Florida State

This sort of pace isn’t unique to the Sunday’s game, it’s a normal part of football these days. If you saw Oregon play Florida State in college football, you saw a similar thing. Rather than using half a minute to stand around and talk about the play, Oregon was averaging a play every 16 seconds – meaning 16 seconds after a tackle was made, they were hiking the ball to start the next play.

For Oregon, this is normal and their conditioning and play calling is designed around it. For most opponents, the pace causes confusion and wears out their defensive players to the point that Oregon often rolls over exhausted defenses in the later stages of the game. The pace of change in the game is not what most opponents’ physical training or play calling training is designed for. As a result, teams often end up reacting on a play by play basis, rather than working their plan. Sometimes, it isn’t pretty, as Florida State found.

This sort of pace isn’t accomplished by simply speeding up the normally slow parts of the game. To execute at this pace requires smarter players, smarter coaches, better technology, as well as training regimens, on-field communication and play calling mechanisms designed to play non-chaotic football that feels chaotic to opponents.

The pace of change in business is no different

Things are no different in business these days and if your market hasn’t experienced it yet, it’s possible that you simply haven’t noticed, or you’ve perceived it as a temporary bump in the road that’s made things feel a bit more chaotic than normal. Be very careful about seeing this as temporary. From what I’m seeing and reading, that bump in the road is a new normal.

The accelerated pace of change has been obvious in the technology space, where there are well-known graphs showing the ever-shrinking time it’s taking for broad market technology adoption to reach a solid level of adoption.

This chart shows the rate of technology adoption accelerating from 1873 to 1991, yet the pace of change during that period is nothing compared to the adoption rate of the last 10 years, where reaching 50 million customers has gone from several decades (telephone, radio) to at most, a few years.

While the adoption time to 50 million users for the iPod (three years) vs. the radio (38 years) may not seem important to your business, the changes hitting your market are accelerating.

Is keeping up…enough?

In the fastest markets, keeping up is incredibly difficult – if not impossible. Yet some are not only keeping up, they’re pushing the changes.

Historically, when the speed of a technology or business function accelerated, it took a while for the level of quality and safety to reach steady state. These days, systems are often built into “the next big thing” (for this quarter) that enable quality and safety to remain stable.

Waiting for things to slow down…isn’t going to happen. If your business is affected by these changes, the methods you use for planning, tracking, finance, execution, supply chain management, manufacturing, hiring, security, business models and many other things have to keep up – and keep keeping up at an accelerating pace.

Keeping up while needing to accelerate your ability to keep up…that’s the trick.

The dangerous thing is thinking that your business isn’t affected by this. Finding a business that isn’t affected by 3D printing, robotics, artificial intelligence, “big data” or cloud computing isn’t easy.

What’s easy is fooling yourself into thinking that it might not affect your business.

I love companies with slow computers

How much money do you waste by making your staff wait for computers?

For slow networks?

For slow internet?

For slow computers?

How hard do you make it for them to get their work done?

How many times has a hotel desk clerk apologized to you at check in time because their computer was not behaving, was slow, or was down? I don’t travel all that much, but I hear this fairly often.

How many times do you get similar messages from retail employees, or from customer service reps that you’re on the phone with?

Regularly, for me.

Is your staff’s productivity hamstrung like this? What impression does a recurring “I’m sorry, my computer is slow, thanks for your patience” message leave with your clients?

I love companies like this – when they’re competition for my clients. Don’t be one of them.

Save your bacon: Backup your stuff

Today was yet another one of those days that come far too often.

A day when someone tells me their computer crashed and they have no backups. For months.

This isn’t a computer at home that’s used for email, Facebook and maybe an occasional game. This computer is used to manage their customers’ technical data and no one has bothered to back it up. We’re talking several gigabytes of contact information, among other things.

The stumper for me is this: Despite the fact that a sizable portion of this company’s tens of millions in revenue depends on the data this software manages, they haven’t backed it up for months.

Computers can come and go – it’s the data that matters. Except for specialty units like servers and such, many of the computers that do what this one does could be replaced by new, much faster hardware for $300-$400. But none of that matters much if you don’t backup your business data.

Every time I think I should give clients a choice about backing up the data created in systems I create, one of these situations pops up to remind me that no choice is necessary.

I have to keep my clients’ best interest at heart *even when they don’t*.

It happens.

Know anyone whose dog chewed through a computer’s power cord? I do. Ever had the power fail while you were doing something important? Did it mess up your data? It will.

Ironically, I lost power a few hours after I wrote the outline for this piece.

Ever had a client call and tell you their computer was stolen and their backup media was sitting on top of the computer – and it’s gone too? I have. Don’t make me nag and wag my finger at you. Backup your stuff

Backup your stuff

Take your business data seriously. Yes, it’s one more thing to do, even though you can automate it – just be sure those automated backups really do work. Do it every week, if not every day for stuff that you truly cannot afford to lose. Don’t be that person who calls and says “…..and we haven’t backed up since…”

The second most important thing about backups is that you can restore them. Save a copy of the backup on a different device – not the same drive your data is on. If your backups are on the same hard drive as your data, you’re doing it wrong. If that drive dies, your backup dies with it.

At least once a month, try to restore on your backups to a different computer. If you can’t, you’re no better off than the businesses who don’t backup at all.

That electricity thing…

I’m a little NASA-ish when it comes to backup power systems. I have an APC SmartUPS uninterruptible power supply (UPS) with automatic voltage regulation (AVR) on every computer as well as the TV. Yes, I really do mean every computer.

While I rarely watch the tube, I don’t want to replace it if I don’t have to. The UPS units are why I have servers that still run after 10 years.

Computers like stable electricity. They, like your data, are an asset. Depending on what type of computer you use, you might be able to replace it for a couple of hundred dollars – but you can’t replace the data.

You can’t get the time back that you’ll waste replacing hardware, reinstalling software, reconfiguring your network and finally, re-keying your data – if you have it.

A $200-300 UPS will pay for itself with the first outage. Having even two minutes to close files and shut things down normally before firing off an email saying “losing power” etc is worth every penny vs. having it all shut down in a millisecond with no notice, damaging data as it goes down.

If and when electricity spikes or failures cream your machine or your data, there is rarely anything your computer person can do to make things right. Quite often, it’s time to replace the computer and start over.

Sound like fun? It isn’t. Save your bacon. Backup your data. Test your backups by restoring them to a different machine. Sleep better at night.

Worth saying twice: I have to keep my clients’ best interest at heart *even when they don’t*.

Accelerated change redefines your market

Last month, Harvard Business Review’s Brad Power wrote a short piece about something software people have known for years, even if they ignore it: The rate of change is accelerating.

http://blogs.hbr.org/2014/06/how-the-software-industry-redefines-product-management/

An excerpt from Power’s piece:

I spoke with Andy Singleton, CEO of Assembla, a firm that helps software development teams build software faster. He told me the story of Staples vs. Amazon. As you might expect, Staples has a big web application for online ordering. Multi-function teams build software enhancements that are rolled up into “releases” which are deployed every six weeks. The developers then pass the releases to the operations group, where the software is tested for three weeks to make sure the complete system is stable, for a total cycle of nine weeks. This approach would be considered by most IT experts as “best practice.”

“Best practice”? Not really, but let’s continue:

But Amazon has a completely different architecture and management process, which Singleton calls a “matrix of services.” Amazon has divided their big online ordering application into thousands of smaller “services.” For example, one service might display a web page, or get information about a product. A service development team maintains a small number of services, and releases changes as they become ready. Amazon will release a change about once every 11 seconds, adding up to about 8,000 changes per day. In the time it takes Staples to make one new release, Amazon has made 300,000 changes.

While this situation is old news to software businesses and even to some non-software businesses that develop their own software, the thing you need to be aware of is that this accelerated rate of change and implementation stretches far beyond software.

You may have heard the phrase “software is eating the world“. In many cases, that’s about software disrupting and improving businesses and sometimes eliminating jobs. It’s also about technology and accelerated change in businesses that haven’t traditionally depended on technology.

This rate of change is reaching into many other niches – some faster than others. The question isn’t “Will it touch yours?”, instead the question is “When?”

Consider Amazon

You might be thinking that Amazon is a relatively new company so it was easy for them to start off producing systems as Power’s piece described. Trouble is, that isn’t the case at all.

While Amazon Web Services (aka AWS – the cloud services side of Amazon) has been around since 2006, Amazon has been around since the mid ’90s. They had to remake themselves to pull this off – but they chose to do so before someone else forced it on them.

Three dimensions

A few years ago, if you were in the engineering prototyping business, you might have a turnaround of a few weeks to a month, depending on the type of pieces you prototype.

Then one day, a 3D printer showed up on a local doorstep. Without a massive capital expense, delay and shop build out, a local engineer could now start turning out prototypes your clients could touch and feel in hours or for larger items, a day or two.

Perhaps you can work with that person to partner on projects and you both win. If you don’t, who will?

You can have a 3D printer on your doorstep tomorrow. What makes you different from the lady down the street who owns one?

The choice

Today, you probably have a choice in the matter.

You can either determine what needs a remake or restructure and make those changes (and experiments) on your terms, or you can wait and let someone else determine the time frame and terms for you. Most of us would prefer not to have someone else calling the shots.

I know, you’re busy. You’ve got this fire and that fire to put out. You’ve got soccer games to get to. I get it. I have those too and so do many other business owners.

It might be hard to justify any sort of disruption, even in thought, if your business is humming along on all cylinders right now.  That’s exactly what the disruptive businesses want. Keep doing what you’ve always done, because it’s still working.

Meanwhile, someone out there is fighting the same fires, perhaps as their business hums along, and all the while, they’re restructuring their business for this new reality.

What if they’re in your market? What if you did it first?

If Godzilla taught user interface lessons…

A few weeks ago, I helped my mom buy an iPad.

You would think that my mom, who is in her 70s, would be the one learning the most from this exercise, but you’d be wrong.

Going through this with her simply reminded me (again) to discard all assumptions when building a user interface, when training and most of all, when designing a process that brings new customers into the fold.

So why Godzilla?

Godzilla has very short arms, much like a T-Rex. Those of you who remember Bill Harley’s dinosaur story about the boy who wanted to be a T-Rex will be familiar with Godzilla’s challenge: Harley’s dinosaur ate the french fries off his plate like a dog because his arms wouldn’t reach the fork.

Godzilla would have an equally rough time using software that assumes the user can touch the iPad’s screen.

What I’m getting at here is that making assumptions about your clientele (or in this story’s case – end users) can threaten your ability to help them if it’s focused in the wrong place because you made too many assumptions.

My Assumptions

Before you think I’m accusing you of making assumptions about your clientele, keep in mind that I had done the same thing prior to going through this iPad install: I assumed that there was some familiarity with iPads/iPhones and touch devices in general – even though I knew better.

While mom has been a desktop computer user for quite a long time – she doesn’t have a smartphone or another touch device, so we were going into uncharted territory. This also meant that there was a pretty good chance that she’d have no familiarity with iOS basics, the iOS app store, iTunes, or anything else in that sphere of knowledge.

The adventure

Let’s go over what we did, what I learned and what you can take away from this little adventure.

The steps we performed: Initial power on, get wireless working so everything else would work, connect to iTunes store, create an iTunes account, timeout while fiddling with passwords and addresses, start over on the iTunes store setup and thus, account setup, then setup iTunes and download the Kindle reader app.

For someone in the geek business, this is a fairly simple exercise. Here’s the trick – if you’re an iPad owner for over a year – do you remember the steps and details of the signup and setup process? Do you think it has changed in the last year, much less two or three years? Of course.

So again, assumptions creep into the discussion. My probably-faulty memory was helping mom through this process without seeing her screen, so another layer of frivolity crept in.

After the create-an-account timeout, things went pretty smooth but the assumption monster was always peeking around from behind the iPad.

Your turn

Given my story about the iPad, think about the process you go through with a new client. Sometimes they seem so lost, so uninformed, so out of touch.

And here we are, looking at them like fools. They are the fools, so to speak, who just paid us to help them deal with the fact that they don’t know the things they paid us to help them with.

Perhaps a definition is in order.

Client (n) – “a person or organization in the case of a professional person or company.”

If your newest client told your best prospect that they are “In the care of…” your business, what would they say?

Is that different you would want them to say? You know the truth, be it good or not so good.

You may call them clients because you want to believe you treat them differently than ‘just a customer’, but if you don’t, they aren’t.

Back to those assumptions

Think about the last time you visited a doctor’s office. You come in, someone shoves a clipboard into your hands and you write the same information three times on different pieces of paper. Occasionally, someone asks a question about one of your answers.

Is this process guided? Non-repetitive? What about your questions? Do all the surprises and customer / client / patient assumptions go away?

On their next visit to your office, shop, warehouse or store… do they know exactly what to expect before they arrive? Do they leave without having experienced unexpected, unpleasant surprises? Do they know what they should expect the *next* time?

Assumptions work that way too.

What if you actually followed up?

Ducks In A Row

Does your business follow up with your clients and prospects like you should?

You should probably consider what “like you should” means, before deciding whether you follow up properly or not.

Having done that, let’s define “follow up” as continuing the conversation with that particular prospect or client, in exactly the context they are in with your business, in a timeframe that makes sense to the client.

This isn’t about you. It’s about them, where their interests lie, what needs they have right now where they are in the flow of things in their life and/or business. Not where you are.

Let that sink in – this is not about you, what your sales staff has on their mind today, where you are with the month’s cash flow, whether or not you’ve made your weekly nut, etc. Thing is, if you do this right, it’ll help you worry a whole lot less about that last one.

Figure out the right whens

If you’re trying to start doing this right, it would help to start with the basics – identifying when to follow up with your clients and prospects. I call these “touch points” (meaning when to reach out and get/keep in touch), but it might make it easier to think about if you view them as events in the timeline your clients and prospects follow as they meet you, become your client and continue down that path until they are no longer your client.

One more reminder, this is about the right time for them, not you.

Here are a few ideas for touch points:

  • Someone becomes a new lead by calling, emailing, filling out a web form, etc.
  • Someone clicks on a link in an email.
  • An existing lead contacted you for info.
  • A lead bought a new product or service.
  • A client bought a product or service for a second-nth time.
  • A client had an interaction with your service department.
  • A client paid a bill on time.
  • A client paid a bill late.
  • A client paid a bill late for the second/nth time.
  • A client fails to buy something on their normal purchase schedule that they used to buy from you on a regular basis.

Take a few minutes to consider what your touch points / events are. You may have a lot more than that, but I would be surprised to find that you had fewer.

Now what?

Let’s analyze the why behind a couple of these so that my comment “Thing is, if you do this right, it’ll help you worry a whole lot less about that last one” makes more sense.

Think about how things work in your business today.

If a client who usually buys something once a month doesn’t buy this month, are you aware of it?

If you aren’t, it’s possible for them to disappear and stop being a client without your knowledge. How many clients do you have that buy something every month? How many of them disappear each month? Do the math and figure out what that could be costing you.

That’s the possible return on investment of being able to follow up when this event happens.

If this purchase doesn’t happen and you know about it, then you can turn your service or sales team loose to make sure nothing is wrong or that conditions have changed for your client. Maybe they don’t need to continue buying that product or service anymore. So be it, but they may need something else. Or you may have had an unfortunate interaction with them.

Whatever the reason, knowing is a ton better than not knowing. You might find out that you will lose them and can’t do anything about it (changes in their needs, etc), but at least you’ll know.

One more example

If a client pays a bill late, do you grumble and add a service charge to their next bill without any conversation? Does the service charge get added automatically?

There are plenty of ways to talk to a client about a late payment without coming off like a jerk. Maybe they need different payment dates, a different payment method or they just missed the invoice somehow because someone was out sick.

Personal follow ups like these can keep a relationship going for years, rather than letting them sour because of a misunderstanding or lack of knowledge.

What happens if I refuse?

Minnesota Guard removes floodwall, opening Minot bridge

Yesterday, we talked about backups.

Did you do anything about it?

If you didn’t, think about this: What would happen to your business if the hard drive containing your customer list, orders, accounting and communications with customers and vendors failed? What would it cost if you lost that data?

I asked startup CEO Doug Odegaard from Missoula for a quick angle on the cost of not keeping good backups. He said “Add up how much people owe you and how much it cost to build your business and that is how much it is worth.

Pratik, a tech business owner from New Jersey who also owns a restaurant, added this: “and don’t forget the good will and revenue loss until operations can resume again“, then reminded me of his experience with a fire:

Mark, if you recall when we had the fire caused by lightning at the pizzeria, I had the entire customer base with purchasing and sales history synced to my home. Insurance company had the first check cut in 10 days of the claim. This practice is so important. We had our standing corporate catering resume in one week from an alternate commercial kitchen which kept revenue coming in as well as routed our VOIP phone service to my mobile for those customers that tried calling. Made recovery a bit easier.

What’s it worth?

That metric Doug offered merits consideration. If you can’t wrap your head around the cost of starting over, doing inventory from scratch, calling all of your customers (assuming you have their contact information somewhere) and asking them to tell you what they orders, how much people owe you and so on, then ask yourself this:

How would you like to go back to the day you started your business and start over?

Ask your insurance agent how many businesses survive a fire or flood if they don’t have these things taken care of.