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Direct Marketing Email marketing Internet marketing

Moving the needle

You have to look to a prospect like the only person who really understands them & their problem. If you make them feel that way, you probably are.

I recently received an email from someone who creates marketing materials. They’re trying to expand their business and having some trouble. They’ve been approaching the top 100 companies in a particular niche after reviewing their website. The approach involves sending them an email specific to a perceived marketing-related need based on their website review. Unfortunately, the effort isn’t getting much traction. That’s why they approached me – to get some help guiding their efforts. They shared an example of the work they might create for someone. Bottom line: They’re trying to move their own needle by moving someone else’s. I have a few suggestions. Maybe they’ll help you too.

Who has the problem you can solve?

The top 100 companies in any broad national market are going to need a very compelling reason to give you any attention for any reason.

A company of this stature has a marketing team, a plan (hopefully), goals / desires, a budget (probably), and they think they know where they are going marketing-wise. Is there an experienced marketing VP or similar at the helm? Probably. Does their marketing team have a (presumably) well-thought out, strategic plan for “hitting their numbers”. I’m referring not just to achieving the lead and closed sale numbers they want.

Companies at this level worry (sometimes legitimately) about mind share, buzz, PR and other metrics that don’t necessarily reflect the quality of their ability to find a lead and convert them to a customer. They’re a top 100 nationwide company.

Is is possible their marketing team is working with a national media / advertising / marketing firm? Do you have experience working with teams like theirs? Do you have a track record of working with companies of their size and stature? You’re going to need to show them that you can play their game on their field.

This group can be difficult to win over. It’s likely that you’ve approached them about something that, while legitimate, may not be on their radar. This group is typically worrying about much bigger things than a tactical omission on their website, for example.

Suggestion: Rather than going after the top 100 companies nationally, identify a few of the best local companies that you’d like to work with. Perhaps they’re in the national market you’ve chosen. It’s much easier to find local companies that need marketing help. Start by focusing on a market you know best. If your skills help one “blow up” (in a good way), you’ll be in demand – and not just there. It will help you decide exactly who you want to be a hero to (and how). From there, it’ll be easier to head into national markets.

Are they mortally wounded?

What you’re missing in the top 100 market approach is identifying what they see to be a profusely bleeding neck wound. You need to identify something so bad that they’re almost embarrassed to talk about it.

What fatal mistakes are they committing? What about their process is so bad that they’re avoiding conversations about it with the owner or EVP? What are they having hand-wringing discussions about at the local watering hole after work? What marketing problems will senior management be grumbling about over dinner, at the golf course, or on the ski lift with other senior management types? Their perception is this: Problems of this nature aren’t going to be easily solved by someone who emails the marketing team about a tactical issue.

Identifying what’s perceived as a missing tactical item on their website is unlikely to generate any interest. Even if you’ve identified what you feel is a fatal mistake on their website, getting their attention will be difficult. These folks receive pitches regularly. Most of them are lazy, fill in the blank style pitches that do nothing but talk about the company doing the pitching. “We can be YOUR (whatever). We’re experts in this, we’re experienced at that” and so on. There’s no conversation about the desired client, their business, or their problem. There’s certainly nothing about the solution that would make them say “These people totally get what we’re struggling with. CALL THEM NOW!”

I realize these aren’t the problems you proposed to solve, but they’re the problems that team is focused on. The profusely bleeding neck wound demands attention.

Suggestion: Choose people whose “marketing wounds” are severe and life-threatening. Show up with exactly the cure they need.

Go deep

Once you’ve identified a prospect, a generic B2B message won’t do. While many in your desired market have similar pains that seem ideal for a fairly generic message, such messages rarely get anyone’s attention. Each of these businesses think their business is totally, completely unique. Hint: They almost never are, even if what they do or sell is unique. That doesn’t mean your message can treat them generically. The message that communicates your proposed solution has to be targeted carefully so that it doesn’t even remotely resemble the random pitches they’ve getting.

If you’re looking for more specific work, you need to dig a bit deeper. The more specific your proposed solution is to their problem, the better your chances. The better you’re able to demonstrate that you understand them, their market, and their struggle – the more likely they’ll be able to realize you’re the right one to help them. From your perspective, the work may be the same work for 10 or 100 of them. From theirs, that isn’t the case.

If you’re looking to help with their website – dig deep on their site. Sign up for whatever freebies and newsletters they have. Are they delivered as promised? Do they provide the information they promised? Do they communicate the message effectively? Do they compel action? Is the information in a format that’s ideal for the desired audience? Does it include options for people who consume visuals or audio better than text? Are those differences important for this audience? What’s missing? Is there a “bleeding wound”? Is there a “What’s next?” Is there a call to action? Is there a head-scratching disconnect? Do the various parts of their site, their emails and other opportunities to engage seem to fit together? If not, what would tie them together and make them work together to get the prospect what they need, make it easy for prospects to determine that whatever they sell is right (or isn’t) for them?

Ultimately, you have to look to them like the only person who really understands them and their problem. If you work hard enough to make them feel that way, you probably are.

Photo by Doruk Yemenici on Unsplash