Make an offer that makes sense

zipper
Creative Commons License photo credit: gagilas

Yesterday, an email from WinZip arrived in my inbox.

I’ve used and liked WinZip for at least a decade. Not many pieces of software can make that claim.

Lately, they’ve been emailing me pretty frequently. This particular email offered a free copy of the latest WinZip if I used their affiliate link to sign up for a free trial with Netflix’s online movie service.

Whaaaa?

Ok, maybe that’s not such a bad deal if I’m not already a Netflix user, but the offer may not make sense depending on what kind of WinZip customer I am.

When I got the email, I wondered “Why Netflix?”

It might make perfect sense if WinZip knows their customer base well. Perhaps they’re sure that a majority of their users are home users, student/teacher users or small business/corporate users. If that were so, it would’ve been best to segment their email list and mail this offer only to their home users. And perhaps I’m somehow on that home list, rather than on their “business customer” list.

Even if all that is true, is this a service that most WinZip users can take advantage of? Does it help their users get more out of their WinZip? Or did they send it because Netflix is a really good affiliate deal for the makers of WinZip?

The offer just doesn’t make sense from a “How can we help you get more out of our software?” perspective – something you should *always* be thinking about, whether you sell software or transmission oil coolers.

In fact, some will see that message – especially at multi-per-week frequencies – as spam.

I’m not convinced that WinZip segmented their email list before sending this out. If they had, it might make sense.

Leverage

In your case, it’s essential to avoid being “one of those people” and eventually ending up on a spam blacklist.

If you’re going to send 3rd party offers to your customers, make absolutely sure they make sense by giving your customer an opportunity to leverage the investment they’ve already made in your products and services.

Whaaaa? Part 2

When you build a commodity (mostly) utility, even one as good as WinZip as been, at some point your business model is going to flatten out. With no recurring revenue, you start doing things like emailing your customers offers to purchase a movie service. Even your business customers.

Think deep and long about that business model. What happens after 100 customers? What happens after 500 or 50,000? What happens 10 years from now?

The more thought you invest in that stuff now, even while building the next-big-thing, the less likely you’ll need to make choices that would never cross your mind otherwise.

3 thoughts on “Make an offer that makes sense”

  1. Pingback: DIYSEO – The Best Small Business Marketing News & Blog Posts of the Week — March 18, 2011
  2. I suppose its the same as any product – unless you can refresh, improve or dominate the market than your sales flatten. Especially if your marketing a single product…

    Segmenting the list is something i hadn’t considered as i don’t think i could break my user list down into such categories but one for consideration?!

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