Are you publishing stale content?

A question hit me a few years ago after the Flathead Beacon​ brought home yet another armload of Montana journalism awards. The question was “Is the column I publish there of (at least) equivalent quality?” In other words, I’m on the pages of this modern, very successful digital (and weekly print) newspaper with multi-award winning journalists and photographers. Am I bringing down the average?

Only the readers (and perhaps the editor) can answer that, but it stuck in my head as something to consider every time I hovered over the “Post” button for a column.

A better question

I believe a better question to ask yourself these days is this: “Is the content I’m publishing worth consuming right now?

What if they aren’t viewing / reading it right now? Am I producing lame content? Stale content? Both?

You might have metrics saying that your audience is pushing your content to Buffer, Flipboard, Reading List, Pocket, etc – but that doesn’t mean they’re actually reading it. My suspicion is that the majority of URLs pushed to deferred reading platforms never get read and another pile of them aren’t read for days, weeks or months. This GigaOm story about the overall Pocket saved-to-stored ratio for all Pocket users backs that up.

Pocket is like your Getting Things Done method’s inbox of reading material. Once a URL is off an active browser tab and resting comfortably in Pocket, it’s off the “I MUST READ THIS BEFORE DOING ANYTHING ELSE!” list. Every time you click that Pocket button, your mind screams with freedom like a Dave Ramsey debt-free caller because you’ve temporarily deferred the guilt of not reading everything. Because, you know, only the very best and most successful business people read everything and everyone else is a failure, right? (Yes, that was sarcasm)

Think about what you write. If it goes into someone’s Pocket for a month, does it lose its effectiveness and impact? Does it matter a month from now if they do happen to read it later? Do they read it later? The GigaOm link says Pocket confirmed that the average Pocketed-to-actually-read for all Pocket users is about 50%. I’ll bet my percentage is lower than the Pocket average because I use it as a keyword-oriented search tool as well as a read-it-later tool. I file something there with tags and later use those tags to find things I need on those topics.

What provoked this thought process? This “content shock” piece from Christopher Penn, which sat in Pocket for a few days before I actually read it. It escaped becoming stale content for me.