A gift for Bobby?

Yesterday, I was reading a comment from Bobby Rich about this small business (whaaaaa?) post on Hildy’s blog.

Bobby took Hildy’s idea, smooshed it around a little and decided to see if it would work for his business.

I like the idea, but I think we can put a cherry on top of that smooshed idea.

No doubt, it’s a nice giveback to the community to promote these local businesses.

In partnership with the local Chamber of Commerce, regional marketing co-op, etc; it might also be a way to promote that group and its members, introduce new members’ businesses, and maybe urge new businesses to join that group.

Even better for Bobby, I’m thinking it’d be a simple way to demonstrate to a small business owner how well radio/tv ads for that business would work on his stations, particularly the small local businesses who might not even consider advertising on radio/tv.

Imagine the reaction of a small business owner who previously balked at the investment of a radio ad, only to find that a free ad ended up generating 100 new customers in a few week’s time – especially if the ad was designed to make the results obvious and trackable to the ad.

Kinda makes a guy wonder…

Baiting the hook with opera

Note the sign at the end of the video: “Ves como te gusta la opera?”, which translated roughly means “See how you like opera?”

Point being – how many of those shoppers had ever been to the opera? And how many *more* will consider it after that performance?

Brilliant, guerrilla marketing. Just flippin’ brilliant.

Before you think “I could never do that”…start planning how you could turn your business into performance art, some how, some way.

When the stream in your backyard doesn’t have any fish, fish where the fish are.

Even Disney’s doing it – treating customers on their birthday

[audio:http://www.rescuemarketing.com/podcast/DisneyBirthdays.mp3]

You know, we’ve talked about this before. 

I’m speaking of the marketing value of keeping track of your customers’ birthdays. 

I know, I know. People won’t give them to you. If so, it’s because you aren’t asking the right way – or you aren’t making the sale.

This is a sale as well. If you told them they were getting something of value as a gift in exchange for telling you what month they were born, most people will sign up. You don’t need the day or the year in order to give them something special for their birthday. 

Don’t waste energy worrying about the ones who don’t join your birthday program – spend your energy on making sure your offer is doing a good job of illustrating the value of the birthday program. 

In the past, we talked about the restaurants (for example) that use this to fill their reservation calendar. Even if you don’t take reservations, you can use this strategy. 

These days, even Disney is doing it

Recently, Disney started offering a free day pass to their parks on their guest’s birthday. If you’ve been to Disney or looked at their pricing, you know that this is not a cheap gift. A one day pass to Disney World is $75.

So why would they do this?

The same reason you should be offering a free dessert or entree or buy-one-get-one (or half or whatever) to your customers on their birthday – because almost no one eats alone on their birthday.

If your family of 4 goes out to Uncle Ralphie’s Gourmet Pizza for dinner tonight for dad’s birthday because dad gets to eat free – you’re still going to buy a meal for everyone else at the table.

Obviously you have to know your numbers to make the right kind of offer, and you might have to tweak it over time, but there’s no reason why it shouldn’t be a profitable event on average.

As for Disney’s reasoning – it’s no different.

Who goes to Disney World by themselves? Sure, there are exceptions. Do you make decisions based on the actions of the 1% or 99%?

Speaking of… happy birthday, Russ. (See, that wasn’t so hard)

The folks at Axe Body Spray think like a guerrilla. Can you?

are you  tough enough ?
Creative Commons License photo credit: piotrek plecke

You’ve likely seen the catchy commercials for Axe products for men.

Here’s an example of how they are always looking for the right opportunity.

They could have staged the run. That would have cost thousands.

This cost them a tshirt and a few moments with a camcorder. My guess is that the guy doing the stunt was one of many volunteers, and possibly an Axe employee having some fun.

A little creative thought goes a long way, even if your product isn’t quite like Axe’s.