Tweaks that touch the bottom line

Yesterday, we talked about a little tiny, totally-free thing that you could do to ensure that someone comes back to your business on a day that you can’t serve them.

As you might guess, there are a bunch of these little things.

They range from how you answer the phone to that little something extra you do when packing something for shipment to a customer.

It definitely impacts how you respond to calls, emails, tweets and other inquiries – such as “Do you have any iPads in stock?” (a frequent question to Apple dealers these days).

How do you answer questions that you *know* aren’t going to immediately close a sale?

Let’s use a software developer as an easy example. Upon detection of an error, they have a ton of choices:

  • You can display a technical message about what happened (“Stack push failure in c70mss.dll at C53DAE.”)
  • You can display a friendly message explaining what happened in non-technical terms. (“I’m not sure what’s wrong, but you’ve gotta reboot.”)
  • You can display a message that provides instructions to fix the problem. (“Don’t do that again. Do this instead.”)
  • You can make the program blow up and force the user to start all over again, and just skip that whole “display a message” thing.
  • You can fix the problem (and if necessary, inform the user) and move on.

That last one might make you scratch your head a bit. Remember, you went to the trouble to *detect it* and create a message, so why not just fix it when you can?

Sure, there are cases where you can’t assume what to do and you have to ask… but those are normally the exception.

Not just the geeks

The same goes for handling customer issues in your business.

You could force your staff to say “Sorry, my manager has to be here to fix that.” or you could simply put a process in place that allows them to deal with it – and do so without risking financial loss.

That’s a win in several ways:

  • It’s a win for your customer because they get helped immediately rather than having to wait for you and even worse, make a return trip to the store for something that should’ve been right in the first place.
  • It’s a win for your staff because it empowers them, giving them the emotional “reward” for helping a customer – which will motivate them to want to continue that little buzz-fest.
  • It’s a win for you because it keeps you off the phone. Rather than dealing with minimum wage questions you shouldn’t be interrupted with anyway, you can keep playing golf, fishing, planning your next strategic move and/or creating the next big thing that’ll push your business into its next big growth cycle.

If Wal-Mart can issue a refund (or execute an exchange) without requiring a phone call to the CEO in Bentonville, I think you can find a way too.

Look around. What can you tweak? Most of these things cost nothing. We might simply be talking about a once a month (or quarter) email.

You simply have to be a little more enthusiastic about thinking about the needs of your customer and how to make the next interaction with your business *even better*.

All of these things contribute to the kind of customer service, the kind of quality feel, the kind of thought process that makes a customer want to do business with no one else but you – even if they can’t put a finger on why that is.

3 thoughts on “Tweaks that touch the bottom line”

  1. Good post. The points on customer focus are important. I also think it is important to ATrust Your Staff to Make Decisions. As you say, this not only provides better direct customer service it engages your staff more on true customer service. Without freedom to act you do the opposite and end up with customers frustrated not only at failed system results but an obviously uncaring company.

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