What happens if I refuse?

Minnesota Guard removes floodwall, opening Minot bridge

Yesterday, we talked about backups.

Did you do anything about it?

If you didn’t, think about this: What would happen to your business if the hard drive containing your customer list, orders, accounting and communications with customers and vendors failed? What would it cost if you lost that data?

I asked startup CEO Doug Odegaard from Missoula for a quick angle on the cost of not keeping good backups. He said “Add up how much people owe you and how much it cost to build your business and that is how much it is worth.

Pratik, a tech business owner from New Jersey who also owns a restaurant, added this: “and don’t forget the good will and revenue loss until operations can resume again“, then reminded me of his experience with a fire:

Mark, if you recall when we had the fire caused by lightning at the pizzeria, I had the entire customer base with purchasing and sales history synced to my home. Insurance company had the first check cut in 10 days of the claim. This practice is so important. We had our standing corporate catering resume in one week from an alternate commercial kitchen which kept revenue coming in as well as routed our VOIP phone service to my mobile for those customers that tried calling. Made recovery a bit easier.

What’s it worth?

That metric Doug offered merits consideration. If you can’t wrap your head around the cost of starting over, doing inventory from scratch, calling all of your customers (assuming you have their contact information somewhere) and asking them to tell you what they orders, how much people owe you and so on, then ask yourself this:

How would you like to go back to the day you started your business and start over?

Ask your insurance agent how many businesses survive a fire or flood if they don’t have these things taken care of.