You can’t read this post. It’s too hard. Probably ought to just quit right now.

Runners on a steep climbUsually when you hear people say things like “It’s too hard” or “I can’t do it”, it really means “I’m not willing to work that hard”, or “I’m not willing to get back up after a setback”.

How many things are really “too hard”, as opposed to simply “requiring sustained effort” despite encountering failures/difficulties along the way?

My guess is: not very many.

So many of the battles we have with ourselves in business, much less personally, are mental battles. The 4 minute mile is a shining example. It isn’t as if Roger was the first guy in history to have the lungs and legs to run that fast. Was he the perfect physical specimen? The quintessential runner? Nope. He was a medical student.

It’s easy to bail out on a project when it gets tough – especially since that’s what people expect. New, challenging projects are often the hardest just before a big success. The irony of that is, of course, that this is when most people give up.

Next time you catch yourself thinking “It’s too hard” or “I can’t do it”, come back here and view the video below.

The boy in this video was born three and a half months premature in the summer of 1994. Weighing only one and a half pounds at birth, he was left with no eyesight in his left eye and only 15% of the vision in his right. It would have been easy for this boy, as well as his family, to give up and think “It’s too hard” or “I can’t”.

Instead, he plays Jimi Hendrix (and more), perhaps like no one else before him, except Jimi. His name is Conrad Oberg.

At age two, Conrad taught himself to play the piano, and again taught himself the guitar at age ten. In this video, he is 12. I suspect that Conrad hasn’t got quitting, can’ting bone in him.

What’s stopping you? More often than not, it’s just you.