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Employees Leadership Small Business

Adaptable to change?

Last week, we discussed ways that employees could make themselves more valuable to their employer and thus, more likely to keep their job. These were focused on how many owners / managers look at their team when things are tight. When things are tight, reducing expenses is always on the table – and rightly so.

We see this done poorly by large corporations on a regular basis. The news will mention that some large company laid off 30,000 workers at one time. It’s hard not to wonder who is managing a business that suddenly figured out they had 30,000 “extra” people. A company doesn’t often find itself in this situation overnight and it’s rarely a secret inside the company when you’re on the way there. Sure, there may be changes happening in your market, but you don’t wait to take action until your only next step is letting 30,000 people go. A company’s leadership shows whether they are adaptable to change, are stuck in denial, or somewhere in between.

That gets us back to keeping your job. One of the angles I didn’t discuss last week was that the likelihood of your continued employment (read: value to your employer) may depend on your demonstrated adaptability to change.

Change never stops

It’s a permanent fixture. Some will pretend nothing has changed or will attempt to take their company back to some magical time in the past, but they are fooling themselves. And yet, these folks exist.

Look back 10 or 20 years in your industry. Has nothing in your business changed? Even the most “primitive” supposedly low-tech businesses have changed in some way over the last couple of decades. How you as an employee respond to changes is everything. Your ability to adapt to change is central to your value to a company. This responsibility to be adaptable doesn’t end there. More than ever, your responsibility extends to your own career.

What do employees see?

When you look back at businesses that failed – regardless of size – one of the major turning points was their inability to recognize change – or their outright denial of approaching changes.

If you see a lack of response to clear and obvious changes in your employer’s market, you’d better be aware of what the company is doing to deal with these changes. If nothing appears to be happening, ask – carefully – about the company’s perspective is on a change that’s become obvious to you.

Don’t position it as criticism. You may not know what has been researched, decided upon, or planned in response to the change. The situation may be top of mind for your company’s leadership.

You may be able to detect this during your conversation. It may become clear that they recognize it and are planning (or taking) action to deal with it.

Alternatively, you may get a vague answer to your question about this change. You may be told “Good question, we’ll talk about that in our next full staff meeting. Thanks for bringing it up.” As long as those gatherings (virtual or otherwise) happen reasonably often, have patience and take action based on how that discussion goes.

On the other hand…

If your question is dismissed as if you don’t know what you’re asking, or you get a response indicating the conversation is over, you need to think about what this change really means. Maybe you misread it. Maybe they misread it. Either way, you need to find out which it is.

Look around and find out how it is affecting your competitors – not just locally, but in a handful of places. You may have to track down industry-wide publications and see if this change is being discussed. Call a competitor’s sales number and ask them about the change you’re concerned about. Don’t accept their response as the be-all, end-all, but file it with everything else you’ve learned.

That’s not my job

Why does this matter? Because you need to figure out if the change risks your career and financial future. Yes, a little bit of Captain Obvious – but this is on you. With very rare exceptions, no one is coming to save or protect your career – except you. It IS your job, like it or not.

If you’ve found yourself employed by a company that isn’t paying attention, you might be the next layoff – no matter how valuable you are. It’s on you not to be surprised.

Photo by Tim Stief on Unsplash