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Business model E-myth Entrepreneurs Leadership

Selling your boomer business

I recently received a note from someone who read “Boomer Business For Sale“. They had some questions about different aspects of selling their business, and I suspect they aren’t alone, so let’s address them here. The premise of the original discussion was that there are roughly 60,000 boomers who are getting ready to retire who are also business owners, and that either someone is going to buy those businesses, or they’re going to disappear. I see this happen with increasing frequency and find it such a waste. These businesses aren’t disappearing because they’re unprofitable. They’re disappearing because they can’t find a new owner.

Recently I saw where a beloved 57 year old butcher shop in Missoula closed. A butcher shop doesn’t stay open that long if it isn’t doing things right – yet… no buyer.

If substantial numbers of these boomer owned businesses disappear, it’ll have an impact on the towns where they live, the people they employ, the people whose businesses they buy supplies and equipment from, the accountants, bankers and attorneys they use – and the revenue that feeds in other businesses.

Ideally, we (as a whole) would benefit if we could reduce the number of businesses that close rather than changing hands. Ideally, we (as a whole) would benefit if we could reduce the number of businesses that close rather than changing hands.

How do I find a buyer?

One of the questions I was asked was about how to market the business that’s for sale. In a word, carefully. Your first thought might be a business broker. In my experience, they should be your last resort because most of them put too many obstacles between you and the prospective buyer.

For starters, don’t put a “For Sale” sign out front. More often than not, tells people “We’re about to close”, which will give some customers the idea that they should look elsewhere before it’s too late. That’s not going to help you in the short term, and it’s not going to help whoever buys your business. If you find a buyer, they’re going to have to win some portion of that business back – and if you have a piece of the future, you’d prefer they didn’t have to do that.

You’ll encounter three types of prospective buyers. Some are buying a job and an income. While that’s fine, many of them will have little / no experience running a business. They will almost certainly want you to owner finance. While there’s nothing wrong with owner financing (in fact, it’s a great way to get your asking price), you’re going to be more concerned offering financing to someone who doesn’t know what it feels like to cut payroll checks, lose sleep over business issues, and deal with grumpy customers – while still keeping them

Other buyers are typically looking for an investment. Not private equity, but experienced business people who want to add to their business portfolio. They own businesses for a living.

Finally, there are competitors and complimentary businesses (the ones two or three towns down the road are good candidates). An in-town candidate is OK, but revealing your sale plans to an in-town competitor can create problems.

Don’t forget competitors

Of all the competitors and complimentary businesses in your market, which of them deserve your business? Which of them are good enough to take your business on and not embarrass you? Why? If you see your best customer in the grocery store six months from now, are you going to be happy to see them, or are you going to turn and go down another aisle?

If you sell to a competitor, you want to sell to the one who isn’t going to make you change aisles. Even though the check is cleared and you’re completely uninvolved in the business, you’re part of that community, and you don’t want to be embarrassed by the buyer’s behavior.

I’d look first at investors, as well as competitors who do what you do, but not in your community. Maybe they have a similar service three towns down the road and they’re looking to grow their business. You could have an intermediary (banker/lawyer) contact them to keep your identity under wraps at first. They don’t need to know whose business it is to examine your financials – which they should ask for very early in the conversation.

Training the new owner

If you’re actively working in the business, you’ll have to train someone to take over that job. In a business where the work is physically demanding, you might be tempted to limit candidates to people who are physically capable and willing to take on that work. If you do that, it’ll reduce the size of your pool of potential buyers.

Unless you are selling to a competitor who doesn’t need to be trained, training will come to come at the worst possible time. You’ve mentally decided to get out (and were there for months before selling), and now, you’re obligated to train this new person. Your sale isn’t really, truly final until that work is done.

The new owner may not even know that they like it yet. Perhaps they’ve done it for someone else for 15 years, and they think that’s what they want to do but they don’t know until they actually run / own it. What if it takes longer than expected? If you walk away, it could damage the business. If you have a fee for additional training in your sales deal (you should), then that still commits you to even more time.

This all started because you were ready to retire. Now you’re spending time training this person and may have to silence the “I should have kept it”, “They don’t get it”. “Will they ever learn?” thoughts. Prepare for this.

Are you really ready to retire?

The idea is that this group of 60,000 Boomer business owners is ready to retire. Are you really? Do you know what’s going to occupy your time once you cash out?

I’ve had conversations with a number of people who retired and were thrilled that they fished, hiked, and golfed every day for three months.. until they got bored. Some people don’t get bored with it. Some might cut back to every other day. Still, some are not cut out for 100% leisure.

A better question might be “Are you ready to sell, or is this about getting out of working every day?” In a business where the work is physical, it’s easy to understand the desire to back off at some point. Our bodies start telling us that they aren’t 29 anymore. Maybe climbing ladders isn’t as easy or fun as it used to be.

You don’t have to go from “I own it / work in it every day” to “I have nothing to do with it.” There are other choices.

Maybe a competitor is better?

Selling to a competitor or complimentary business should be an easier exit. Someone who is already successful and in a similar business is more likely to be able to organize the resources needed to buy you out since they’re already successful and have clientele in that market.

Somebody who owns a competitive / complimentary business is more likely to stick with it. They know what they’re getting. So if you do get to a point where you agree for at least a partial owner finance, a competitor / complimentary business is a better choice.

Don’t get me wrong, there are highly motivated, sharp people out there who are looking for an income and a job, and they’ll have bigger dreams than just buying a job. Maybe they’re going to buy yours first, then buy two or three more, and maybe make an empire out of it. You’ll know when you meet one of them – and you’ll know who is real and who is blowing smoke.

The real pain of selling

If you ask business owners who’ve sold their business, they’ll probably mention that due diligence was a pain. Someone doing proper research isn’t intentionally making it a hassle, but it’s a lot of preparation to satisfy due diligence questions. Be prepared for that before you say “It’s for sale.” Ask your banker, attorney & someone you know who has sold / bought a business recently about the processes. Prepare in advance, as it’s not fun to do that work under deadline when you have a buyer at the door, checkbook in hand. The last thing you really need is to feel the pressure of “I’ve got to produce all these documents and all these numbers under a deadline before they go buy something else.”

All this information should be available if your managerial accounting & business metrics are under control, but they usually aren’t.

Consider being an owner

This whole selling a business thing is complicated, isn’t it? Now you know why a lot of businesses simply close. Selling a business is work. It’s usually worth it, but it isn’t easy. And yet, it’s possible to avoid a fair bit of the work we’re discussing.

Some of you have been running a business for a long time. Some have been working for / in the business, as well as owning it. Running it and working for it are not the same. If you have to get in the truck every day and go out to a job site, or open the computer and stick your face in a spreadsheet or programming tool in order for your business to get paid, you’re working for the business, even if you own it.

It doesn’t have to stay that way. If you’re not sure about the pain of stepping away, consider finding someone to take on the physical part of the job. In that mode, you’re hiring skilled people for a specific job (as opposed to “business owner”).

For now, let them do the work. Do nothing but manage that business. Once you see what it takes to manage the business day by day – while doing nothing else – then you can easily identify the skills needed to bring on a manager. Perhaps you look for a manager who is interested in owning the business, perhaps in partnership with the person you hired for the “skilled position”.

Test your team – and yourself

At some point, you should have systems and processes setup so that the skilled person is handling whatever “working for the business” work that generates revenue, and your manager is… managing. Get things to the point where you can take off for three weeks and disappear (or so they think – if you need that at first).

Because you still own the place you’ll want to have internal controls in place. These inform you and your manager that everything is where it should be, running as it should be, etc. Combined with a few metrics, you can watch the business from afar.

What metrics? Think about a few pieces of info from each department that would allow you to sleep comfortably knowing your team has everything under control. Even if you don’t see them as “departments”, they still exist. Finance and Sales exist even in the smallest of companies. You already know what metrics are important. Now consider what’s important at a distance.

Finance: What’s AR look like? What’s your free cash look like? Are any payments overdue? Are we current on tax filings?

Sales: What was revenue last week? Last month? How many bookings do we have for the next 30 / 60 days?

Even though you could get the numbers yourself, a regular report from your manager that provides these figures and advises what they’re doing about them will be useful for non-distracted time away from the business and quality sleep.

Still uncomfortable? Still can’t sleep? Maybe the wrong manager. Maybe insufficient systems or metrics. Get with the manager and get to the bottom of what’s uncomfortable and have them patch that hole.

One thing to avoid, unless there’s no choice – avoid getting back into the weeds. Guide your manager through the weeds. Have them guide their team through the weeds. Don’t get into them yourself.

You have options

For the short term, ownership can be an easier option. You can be involved with the business when they need your expertise, while stepping off for a while to determine what your future looks like. All the while, you can take a distribution from the business, even though it may be lower than what you were taking before.

You’ll still have all the equity until you decide to consider your next step, like selling the business to your manager and lead “do-er”, or selling it to someone else.

The unanticipated reward is that a business that no longer requires you to be there every day is worth more and is easier to sell. Until that day comes, it’ll be easier on your mind and your back.

Photo by Jonny Caspari on Unsplash

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Business culture E-myth Employee Training Employees Management

“Sink or Swim” is not training

Pentagon Secretary Rumsfeld once said “…you go to war with the army you have, not the army you might want or wish to have at a later time.” He wasn’t referring to the Army personnel, or to their level of training, but to the number of Humvees that were not armored and therefore prepared for Iraq-style guerrilla warfare, IEDs, etc.

While you don’t need armored equipment for your team, they do still need to be prepared to succeed in their roles. Failing that, they will show up and do their best. Rumsfeld’s troops may have lacked the amount of armored equipment, but they didn’t lack training.

That is one of the primary differences between the military and business: Businesses often fail to invest sufficiently in training. It doesn’t matter if they are new to the business or experienced. Your team needs training and equipment. A lack of training might prevent reasonably effective use of the equipment you provide.

Sink or swim isn’t training

Employees are sometimes expected prove their worth via “sink or swim”. They’re expected to get started and become effective and valuable on their own. Failing to do so is “sinking”, and may result in the loss of that person’s job. When the employee is new, and the skill require is sales, sink or swim is usually little more than setting up the employee for failure.

I’ve seen this touted as a means of “separating the men from the boys“, so to speak. The euphemism is about identifying who is ready and able to produce results, but the reality is more nuanced than that. When you put an untrained or poorly trained sales employee on the floor, on the lot, or wherever they work with prospective customers, never forget this: They’re dealing with prospects.

At your car lot or furniture store, you know the business. If 100 people walk in on a Saturday, you can probably tell me within a small margin of error how many are “just looking” and how many are ready to buy. Likewise, you probably can tell me how many of that 100 you’ll likely sell that day. How many of those prospects are you willing to give to someone else because an untrained salesperson loses them? First impressions are everything. If your team is ineffective when the prospect makes that first visit to the showroom, lot or office, you probably know the likelihood that they will return.

Sink or swim undermines a new (or inexperienced) employee’s confidence, which will certainly be reflected in their performance and interaction with every prospect and client. Worse yet, your prospect may leave and never return because they had an ineffective, unproductive experience with someone who simply wasn’t trained well enough to provide for their needs.

Think of the most valuable customer you have. The one who buys furniture every 10 years for their 50 employee office. Or the one with a fleet of pickups for their on-site service people. How would you feel if you found out your new salesperson was sinking when they met the person who would have been your next “most valuable customer”?

Training isn’t fluff. You can tie real dollars to it.

Got the basics?

They’re called “The basics” because everyone should know them. Don’t assume everyone knows them. Train the basics. Vince Lombardi started a championship run by saying “This is a football” to a roomful of experienced pro football players. Take nothing for granted.

As I visit businesses with the intent of making a purchase, I routinely encounter salespeople who exhibit behavior that leaves the impression that they are untrained, or perhaps under-trained. Some are young and perhaps inexperienced, yet some are not as young and not as inexperienced.

Commissioned salespeople walk around without business cards, don’t know their product as well as the prospect, don’t attend to new arrivals “in the sales arena”, etc. At some level, these problems are the salesperson’s responsibility, yet new and under-trained salespeople don’t often realize they are under-trained. They can lose a great prospect who “appears indecisive”, but in reality is annoyed. Ultimately, these issues are on management. Management decides who gets trained, when, and for what skills.

Good salespeople deliver value. I visited a Michael’s Saturday to get a frame re-glassed. The employee in framing told me exactly what would happen, when it would happen, what else I could expect, and the guaranteed service window. This was not a big ticket purchase – yet this person was obviously well trained in what to communicate to me. I’ll go back because that guy made a routine purchase memorable. Isn’t that what you want?

Photo by Jay Phagan

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Automation E-myth Improvement Management Productivity Small Business strategic planning systems

How fast can your business go?

Is your business ready to face a no-huddle offense?

In case you aren’t a football fan, here’s a quick summary of differences between “regular” and “no-huddle” offenses:

  • A regular offense has 25-30 seconds (depending on the league) to “read” signals (instructions) from coaches on the sideline, swap players in and out from the bench (if desired), huddle (have a brief meeting) and start the next play. In the huddle, the quarterback tells everyone what the play is, communicates the information necessary to run the play, and makes sure everyone knows what signal they’ll use to trigger the hiking of the ball to start the play. The read, swap, huddle process starts as players walk and/or jog back to their teammates at the end of the previous play.
  • A no-huddle offense handles the read signals, swap players and huddle steps as they run back to the line to setup for the next play. As soon as they are set, the ball is usually hiked to start the play. Instead of 25-30 seconds between plays, you might see 8 to 12 seconds (on average) on a well run no-huddle offense.

The big difference between these two setups is that the defense also has the same time to read, meet, swap and setup for the next offensive play – with the regular offense. With the no-huddle offense, the defense has to react much more quickly. While the offense has to move fast to keep the defense “unprepared”, they at least know what’s going to happen next – even if the quarterback makes last minute changes (audibles) before the play starts.

A no-huddle offense quickly exposes defenses that haven’t practiced against no-huddle offenses. More importantly, it exposes a team without a system in place to deal with playing a no-huddle team.

Ok, that was a long-winded setup, but I didn’t want to lose anyone unfamiliar with football in the U.S. The point of comparing the regular offense and the no-huddle offense is that there are parallels between how defenses handle the tempo of a no-huddle game and how your business deals with the increasing tempo of business, much less the pace of change.

Are you feeling the pressure to deliver faster than last year? Did you go faster last year than the year before? Do you expect this need to accelerate every year is going to continue, or do you think that things will go back to normal once you get past this next push?

I think you need to plan on need for speed sticking around for the duration.

Two ways to go fast

With that expectation on your back, the need to increase There are two ways to go fast – with haste, or with a system.

While those who start off with haste might get a lead, it’s pretty typical that they will find themselves assembling the plane while rolling down the runway. Some pull it off. Most don’t, because they aren’t designed for speed. Instead, they simply decided to go fast.

Deciding to go fast is OK. Deciding to do it without a system designed to keep the quality of everything at level your clients are used to (or better) is risky.

Systems are the key

A system of systems is what you’ll need to increase speed without losing the quality and other factors your clients already depend on. Each system can be simple, but you have to be able to replicate it, perhaps automate it and most of all – depend on it to perform a certain job. A system’s job might be to check the quality of one step of a process, or simply to verify its completion. 10 systems might check quality at 10 places, or might make sure you follow up properly, insure that you have the right data recorded, or confirm that you have the right materials and labor scheduled for a particular item. These processes become a system of systems when they work together to help your business work.

When this system of systems is designed to protect the moving parts of your business, then you’re designed for speed and can increase the speed of production and delivery without risking quality and reputation.

Once you have these things in place, you’ll be more difficult to compete with. Not only do competitors have to keep up with your quality, but now they also are forced to deal with the pace you maintain.

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Automation Business model Business Resources E-myth Management Marketing Small Business systems

Big Data, Small Business

Last week, we talked about questions.

Questions tend to produce answers and more questions, which can result in a pile of stuff that overwhelms a small business.

As a business and client base scales, these questions produce data that you can use for guidance, decision making and to ask even better questions. Again, this can result in a pile of stuff (data, in this case) that overwhelms a small business.

A common reaction to this phenomena is to ignore the data, or to be so overwhelmed by its volume that you can’t discern anything from it. Entrepreneurs tend to want to do it all and if they can’t do that, doing part of it seems like a failure. It isn’t.

Identifying your big data

Let’s look at one of the questions from last week’s post and see which ones are likely to produce decision-making data.

How does this impact our key performance indicators? Examples: cost per lead / new client / sale / deployment, support load, lead time, etc.

This implies that you already know your cost per lead, cost to acquire a new client, cost per order/sale, cost per deployment, average lead time per product/service and the support/customer service load your products and services require. Not gut feel, but actual numbers.

Actual numbers are important because our gut is often right when it comes to strategic decisions and the like, but it seldom has a clue when it come to numbers like cost per lead – particularly if you’ve never watched it.

Lead cost, sources, media and campaigns

For example, what impacts cost of a lead at your business?

Lead source is a good place to look.

You might get leads from referrals (cheap and strong, warm leads), from local TV ads, from local newspaper ads, from different media in your education-based marketing, from the phone book (yes, some businesses still depend on those leads), from direct mail (likewise, still quite productive if used properly), from your website, mobile app, and so on.

Each of these have different creation and distribution costs. Each will produce a different lead flow, much less volume and types of client. While in the beginning, you’re likely to lump all of this data together, at some point you need to break them out by media and eventually, by campaign.

You’ll want to do that so that you can answer questions like this:

  • How do you know which media produces the most profitable clients?
  • How do you know which campaign (and on which media) produces what number and type/quality of client?
  • How do you know if a particular campaign works well on one media, but terribly on another?
  • How do you know which media (or campaign) tends to produce clients that are high maintenance to the point that you tend to fire them or not accept them in the first place?
  • How do you know which media produces the best (however you define that) clients you have? Is there a specific type of campaign that does this?

From time to time, an owner will tell me that their businesses doesn’t do any marketing so this kind of thing doesn’t help their business. If that’s really true, you’ll usually have referral sources that produce more and better leads than referrers do.

Would it be helpful to know who is sending you the best referrals?You probably have a gut feel on this, but are you sure that it’s accurate?

Thinking back on those questions

Given the detail on the one question of cost per lead, you can see how this can become overwhelming in a hurry. Don’t fall victim to that. Take it a step at a time.

You may start with another metric. Cost per lead is important for almost everyone, but it isn’t always the best place to start.

When you ask questions like “How did the pilot program go?” – it might provoke follow up questions about the data collected during that pilot which would support the “How did it go?” question.

If those answers aren’t backed with data, then that might provoke you to add data collection to your pilot projects in the future. This will take more time but it will produce better answers that don’t depend on gut feel or a need to be right.

Better answers are what we’re looking for.

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Business culture E-myth Employees Entrepreneurs Improvement Leadership Management Small Business Software business strategic planning The Slight Edge

Ask great questions

I’m always looking for better questions to ask.

Good questions educate me about a situation or a mindset someone is in and help me understand where they’re coming from.

Great questions can open the mind of the person you ask the question of. They tend to create discussions that create slight momentum shifts toward changes previously considered “impossible”,  “too costly” or in conflict with existing thoughts, processes and mindsets that are considered sacrosanct.

Asking great questions without belittling or embarrassing the person being asked is an essential skill whether you’re a journalist, salesperson, manager or business owner. Journalists who ask a mix of good and great questions not only get good answers from the podium, but also provoke the listener or viewer to think hard about their position and what formed it.

I suspect you can think of a few questions of that nature related to the social and political issues of the day. What I would encourage is considering what good and great questions you should be asking your staff, your clients and yourself.

Here are some of the useful questions I’ve collected over the years:

  • Why? (often asked repeatedly)
  • Why not?
  • So? (Be careful, this can come off as a bit rude)
  • What if our belief / prediction / estimate is wrong?
  • If we suspend our tightly held opinions for a moment, what else becomes possible?
  • How can I help?
  • What can I eliminate, add, accelerate, decelerate, start or stop that will help?
  • Help me understand.
  • What’s the biggest risk in doing this?
  • What’s the biggest risk in not doing this? This often works better than the prior question because most of us easily identify “Why we can’t / shouldn’t do this” items.
  • If this fails, what is plan B?
  • Why does that matter? This tends to provoke different responses than “Why?” by digging a little deeper into the Why.
  • What does this accomplish?
  • If this works, what’s the next step?
  • If this fails, is that OK?
  • How does this add value to the things we find important?
  • Can you give me a bit more detail on how you got there? Good for digging deeper on an idea or analysis.
  • How will this impact our clients’ ability to deliver what their clients need and want?
  • If this is wildly successful, are we as a company structured to handle that kind of success?
  • Is this designed to handle 10 times the input, output or clients we currently expect if we provide the necessary infrastructure to support that growth?
  • And that’s important because? (often repeated)
  • What challenges must be overcome to pull this off?
  • Can we talk about how we’ll deal with those challenges?
  • How does this impact our key performance indicators? Examples: cost per lead / new client / sale / deployment, support load, lead time, etc.
  • What opportunities does this provide to our partners?
  • Help me understand how this strengthens our core business.
  • Is this in conflict with our values?
  • How does this support our values?
  • How did the pilot program go?
  • What did our clients say about it?
  • What about this is really important to you, your crew and our clients?
  • What data will be used to monitor this project / activity? How will it be measured? Do we know what the decision points are for that data? How were those points determined?
  • Do you have what you need to do this?
  • How can we communicate this effectively to clients and internally?
  • How does this drive our “one number”? Your number might be webinar views / month, the number of after hours service calls, free trials / month, or average days between purchases. A car lot might see a visit to the lot with a spouse as a leading indicator.
  • What are your biggest barriers to success? What’s the plan to deal with them?
  • Who isn’t “on board” with this? Why?
  • If we remove our egos / need to be “right” from this discussion, what changes?
  • What are the weaknesses in this plan? Do you need help with them?
  • Who are your strongest leaders and how are you developing them to handle more responsibility?
  • What are you doing to attract new talent?
  • What expectations does this set?  How will we manage them?
  • What are you doing to identify and develop both new and existing leaders on your staff?

What good and great questions do you ask?

Categories
Amazon Automation Box stores Business culture Business model Competition Direct Marketing E-myth ECommerce Leadership Retail Small Business strategic planning Technology Wal-Mart

Doing ahead, not just thinking ahead

Quite often, I talk with business owners about thinking ahead.

Something that happened yesterday tells me that I need to change my terminology to “Doing ahead.”

Why the change?

Primarily, I’m concerned that small businesses are thinking ahead, but stopping there.

Thinking ahead discussions often include strategic thoughts of putting yourself out of business by inventing new products and services for your customers that replace your current top seller.

So let’s talk retail for a moment, since they’re an easy example.

Every time you enter a WalMart store (something I try to avoid – I’m just not into the crowds), you’re likely to see something different. Just a little thing here or there that’s different. Sometimes it’s a test to see how something works, other times it’s the result of such tests.

What you never see is exactly the same store, time after time, town after town. Sure, the overall store is quite similar overall but there’s almost always something different. Something being tested. Something being implemented.

This effort isn’t limited to their brick and mortar stores. WalMart and the rest of big retail spend a lot of time looking at how they can improve the performance of their online retail properties. They have lots on their todo list simply by comparing themselves to Amazon.com – which blows away most (if not all) online retailers in end to end performance and customer engagement.

This is the price they pay for ignoring Amazon during their climb to cruising altitude.

What we don’t see is massive shifts designed to make the store or parts of the store irrelevant. It doesn’t mean they aren’t there, but they’re much harder to see in a brick and mortar store. Honestly, I can’t think of the last time I saw a brick and mortar store do something like this but I suspect I just don’t recall it.

Amazon tweaks too

Naturally, Amazon.com is working hard to improve what they already do – testing and tweaking their retail site and their back end (such as the systems that email you about things you might be interested in). You can see evidence of this on a regular basis.

Meanwhile – they’re doing things like what you see in the video above (More video here from 60 Minutes).

This isn’t just about speed, though that is certainly part of it. Keep in mind that this also means that Amazon can deliver without using any of the established shipping systems – all of which have legislative limitations as complex as those currently preventing the use of shipping drones. The only difference is that no one wrote a pile of legislation in the 1920’s to protect the USPS, Fedex or UPS – all of whom are just as likely to have drones in their future.

Parts of this are not just changing the rules but eliminating them wholesale. I would expect this to be implemented in other countries long before it happens in the U.S., due to the legislative challenges here. We’re already well on the way to delivering relief supplies via drone. Why not retail?

Learning while looking ahead

Learn from seeing Amazon look years ahead without a guaranteed payoff, hitting on pain points, looking to shorten the sales cycle (money loves speed), looking to eliminate competitive disadvantages with WMT, looking to improve/control shipping, etc – while ignoring the fact that they can’t put the drones into service and prepare for the day when they can.

They’ll be learning new things about their business and their customers as well.

The challenge for you and for businesses all over the world is not to see another way that Amazon will eat your lunch, or to think you’re safe because you aren’t in retail, aren’t near an Amazon fulfillment center or are in a rural location unlikely to be served by drones.

Your challenge is to think beyond the advances you’ve been working on or considering. Those advances are important, but you also need to be figuring out things that are years off, all while considering what will replace them.

The dangerous thought is to ignore these things because they don’t threaten you now and wont for years.

Why is that so dangerous? Because that’s exactly what many in Amazon’s market did a decade or so ago – and they still haven’t caught up from making that mistake.

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Automation Business Resources coaching Competition Customer relationships customer retention Direct Mail Direct Marketing E-myth Email marketing Facebook Getting new customers Lead generation Marketing Public Relations Sales Small Business The Slight Edge Twitter Video

Start a streak

What have you done every day, every week or every month for years?

For example, I’ve written a weekly column for the Flathead Beacon since 2006.

I don’t get a week off from the column if it’s Christmas or the Fourth of July. It just gets done.

Some find that a massive, if not surprising, achievement. Others see it as if it were a ball and chain.

Me? It’s just something I need to get done every week. Some weeks, it’s harder than others – but I still make sure it gets done – and yes, I’m better at getting that done regularly than I am at some other things because I’m accountable to the community who reads it.

The value of that accountability shouldn’t be discounted. It’s a powerful tool and motivator.

Think about it

Think about the consistency of the tasks *you* perform to grow your business. Would more consistency in how you podcast, blog, tweet, vlog, post to Facebook, send an email, make a call, drop a mailing or send a newsletter mean more/better business? Would adding a new item to the list make more of an impact?

Of the things you do regularly, which of them produce the best response? (if you don’t know – fix that)

Would it help if that work was done more often? Think about it.

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Business culture Competition E-myth Employees Entrepreneurs Habits Improvement Marketing Personal development Productivity

Business insight from the back of a shampoo bottle


Creative Commons License photo credit: thejbird

When are you going to get serious about your business?

Identify one thing you can do today to attract a new customer, educate a prospect or answer a common question.

Do it again tomorrow. If daily is just too much (seriously?), can you do it every couple of days, or at least once a week?

Once the habit is cemented in place, don’t stop. Ever.

Now find another rough edge in your business. Repeat the same process.

Like the shampoo bottle says: “Wash, rinse, repeat.”

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attitude E-myth Employees Entrepreneurs Habits Improvement Leadership planning Productivity Setting Expectations Small Business Strategy

Why don’t we do what we know must be done?

Change is hard.

We often don’t make a change because just thinking about it tends to be unpleasant, never mind the change itself.

We’ll think about it and mull it over and consider our options like we do about stopping for gas. We’ll glance at the pump as we pass by and put off the inevitable until the needle falls into that “below-the-E” zone where you know you’re in trouble if you don’t stop soon.

The decision to pull over and take 10 minutes to ensure that you can continue for hours or days takes just an instant. Yet many of us wait until forced to do it.

What actions are you waiting to be forced into? What would change if you didn’t wait?

It’s about the pain

Jim Rohn used to say “We don’t change until the pain of change becomes worse than the change of same.”

Yet we know better. Every day people make a decision not to fix something, change their mindset (or at least start down that path) or deal with the 500 lb gorilla in the room.

I sit in meetings with regularity where the obvious thing that has to be faced is ignored as if time will make it go away. Every day, the cost of not facing that thing increases.

Yet we continue to stall.

Why?

In the past, some have proposed that we’re afraid of reaching the destination we claim we’ve sought for years. In a few cases, that might be true, but I suspect that for the majority of people and businesses, advance thought might never have gone that far.

What important task have you avoided thinking about this month? What would happen if you forced yourself to focus on it for 15 minutes?

Procrastination

How many times have you thought about a problem you wanted to solve, then bought something (a book, service, etc) to help you address it – and then did nothing with the resource?

Our minds get satisfaction from the purchase. That little bit of dopamine is enough to pacify some of us. It pretends to be action.

We stop on the first rung of the ladder, or the second, or worst, the last.

When it comes to the most important thing you’re putting off, what rung are you on? Do you have more trouble starting or finishing?

Inertia

The trouble with inertia is that it seems to sprout from a smaller version of itself. It does this without water, sunshine or even MiracleGro.

Yesterday’s inertia morphs tomorrow’s seemingly insurmountable mental castle surrounded by alligator-infested waters. It grows like interest on a credit card bill. Every day, its slightly heavier weight eats away at you, your life and the stuff that needs to get done.

What’s the source of your inertia? Worse yet, what feeds it?

Overwhelm

Every marketer knows that if you present too many choices to a prospect, they’ll often choose nothing. They’ll….procrastinate, secretly hoping that the list will shrink and make the selection easier.

It isn’t much different than a todo list with 300 items on it or a TV listing with 300 channels or that restaurant menu with 40 appetizers.

Overwhelm breeds inertia. Would half as many choices help you get moving?

Momentum

There are two kinds of inertia. The kind we just talked about – the bad kind – is the inertia that keeps you from taking the first step, the next one or the last one.

With just one step, the bad kind transforms into the smallest instance of good inertia. Movement. It creates momentum, however small.

That first bit of movement spawns more. Every little decision you make in your day either contributes to it or undermines it.

Think about the little things that hurt your momentum. Stop doing them or at least, do them less often.

Think about the little things that fuel your momentum. Do more of them, however tiny.

Essential Keys

If you must, start with the smallest thing. Then the next size up. Build upon each tiny victory, even if it’s something as simple as sticking a stamp on an envelope or writing one page of that book.

The small victories, like tinder and kindling for a fire, are what build you into a sustainable force.

Do what must be done. Start right now.

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Business culture E-myth Employees Feedback Improvement Leadership Management Positioning Productivity Small Business

How Shiny Is Your Robot?

Le Grand Eléphant // The Great Elephant
Creative Commons License photo credit: Stéfan

Have you ever noticed how careful we are as business owners to take good care for our expensive business equipment?

Like…robots.

Robots get their hydraulic fluid changed, hydraulic lines pressure checked, wear points examined, worn parts replaced, firmware updated, tolerances tested, configurations checked and their overall performance checked.

When a robot doesn’t measure up, it isn’t thrown away. It’s repaired and retrofitted, upgraded, updated and/or refurbished until it performs at the level of the other robots.

Fleet

Our company vehicles get similarly detailed maintenance and regular upkeep.

When I get my oil changed, I see the oil change shop’s company account list on the wall next to the register. You’ll see every sizable business in town that has a fleet of vehicles. All of them get regular fluid checks and other services. Business owners want their vehicle investments not only to last, but to serve them well every day.

Airliners get even more stringent maintenance. Safety is critical, but so is fuel efficiency, so we check everything and update anything we can on those planes to provide better safety and better “mileage”. Wiring, hydraulics, metal stress, backup systems. Backup systems for the backup systems.

Restful

You’ve seen the form on the back of the restroom door with times and initials. Someone’s “real job” is interrupted every few minutes or hours because some business owners/managers have learned over time that the state of customer restrooms is important.

When it comes to regular attention and upkeep, many businesses check the cleanliness of their customer restrooms several times per day. Some check them as often as every 30 minutes – even in businesses that don’t seem to offer the kind of service that would make you think they’d care about their restrooms.

Even in some of the dirtiest businesses, I’ve found a checklist on the back of the restroom door. That form must be initialed and marked with the date and time so that someone in management knows that the restroom got a once-over few hours throughout the day. Fail to initial the box within a few minutes of the right time and what happens?

Usually discipline.

People?

It makes perfect sense to every business owner to provide this level of care for expensive robots, vehicles and airliners a business invests in. It even makes sense for restrooms.

It either saves us money, keeps our customers safe, makes our business run more smoothly, produces our products faster and with better quality and even smells better.

Yet we see employees every day in customer-facing jobs that need to be trained. They start a new job and are shoved in front of a business’ customers with little more than a uniform shirt and a name tag. Why in the world would you hire someone, even for the summer, and then put them on the job untrained?

Do you care that little about the service your customers receive?

People are often the most expensive asset you have – and the one with the most potential to become your advantage. If you look around, you’ll find situations where the most rudimentary front line staff positions have hard-working people failing in the obvious public-facing ways simply because they haven’t been trained to do things “our way”.

Invest

Meanwhile, we try all sorts of things to manage our staff’s time. We hound them to get them to initial that restroom clipboard every 30 minutes because it proves to someone that “we keep our restrooms clean”. We value the speed and the interval that they show up in that restroom more than we value the job they actually did while there. Our controls over showing up demonstrate that.

The clipboard’s initials don’t say “I left this bathroom so clean my mom would approve.”  They say “I walked in and at the least, initialed the form” because that’s what we measure.

Yet you do it for robots

We check restrooms every 30 minutes. We retrofit, upgrade and reprogram robots. Yet some of us don’t work at all to invest time (much less money) in the improvement and training of our staff.

It’s time to focus as hard on them as we do the condition of the restrooms.

Imagine if both were highly polished.