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Employees Management

How to keep a job

Most of the time, I’m writing to employers – business owners – because most of us need some sort of help at one time or another. One of the things they sometimes struggle with and rarely discuss – particularly with their staff – are things like hiring, making payroll, figuring out who is making things happen, etc. All managers need help that they haven’t asked for.

What’s frustrating them?

If it isn’t already obvious, ask. Yes, ASK. If it’s obvious, see what you can do to take care of the problem. Find a way to ask that shows you care – assuming you do. If you don’t, maybe you’re what’s frustrating them. If you don’t care and it’s because of something going on in the shop / office, don’t they deserve to know? Don’t assume they do – because managers don’t see / hear everything.

If any of these things are your sweet spot – the things you like to do and are good at – offer to help and tell them why – **because** they are your sweet spot.

Who picks up the socks?

What I’m referring to here is little things left undone around the office. If you take care of these things, it will usually get noticed. If it doesn’t get noticed after a week or so, ask if it’s OK that you take care of those things when you have a few minutes at the end of your work day.

There are people who notice these things and people who don’t. Of the people who notice them, there are those who walk past them and those who pick things up and put them away, etc. Be the second person. It’s a little thing but it sends a message that you care about the place. In some cases, you might be eliminating a safety issue that keeps a co-worker from being injured.

This may seem like a little thing, but injuries to someone can impact production, potentially cause missed deadlines, and perhaps result in additional costs for your company. If the injured person is a key employee due to their skill, knowledge etc – the impact might be more significant. Despite those things, none of us want a co-worker to get hurt on the job – and we don’t want that for ourselves.

Create additional value

I know, “create additional value” seems a little buzzword-y, but think about the things you do from A to Z. Little things make a difference to your employer, but also to your company’s customers. Small touches take only a moment, but can make a difference. You know how this feels when it’s done for you.

A good way to create additional value is to notice things that can be improved AND do something about them. Duh, right? All of us can probably think of projects around the office or shop that seem to get hung up for reasons clearly within our control – yet it happens anyway. What’s the cost of a delayed project? Do we have to refund all or part of a payment? Do we lose a job? Does it cause us to lose a customer? Maybe all three.

Someone sees what’s causing the problem, even if it isn’t you. If you’re that person, make an adjustment if you can do so without creating drama. If you don’t know, ask a co-worker. Someone probably has a theory about what the problem is. Why wait until some manager notices – IF they notice?

I know these are simple, obvious things. If you think that, you’re probably already doing these things. If you aren’t, ask yourself why. Solve problems even before you’re asked – unless that can cause other problems.

Might help you get a job

Interestingly enough, these things are also good conversation during an job interview. Hiring managers and owners want to be sure that you’re the right person. Those who have gotten good at hiring have usually gotten that way by initially being bad at hiring.

Ask them what’s frustrating them, what isn’t getting done for unknown reasons, what’s taking too long. Do so from a place of curiosity, not ego. You’re trying to find out how you can help, not reminding them of their shortcomings. If the things they bring up are strong points for you, say so. Tell them how you think you can help. Tell them why you like doing those things and what your past experience is in fixing those problems. If you can discuss prior outcomes from similar work, do so.

Photo by Nate Johnston on Unsplash