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Entrepreneurs Management

Are you keeping up?

Are you keeping up? Gotten a bunch done over the last few months? No? What’s wrong with you? It’s not much of a stretch to think it may have riled up your imposter syndrome or maybe a small bit of regret at your lack of productivity vs. “the hustlers”. Take a look at what some people have done. If you make the mistake of adopting it as your standard of what you should have done during that period, then surely you should’ve done more. Taylor Swift created an entire album over a 16 week period.

What’s YOUR story?

Seriously, it’s OK. You don’t know what’s behind their curtain. It’s not the same as yours. You can work on that, but it isn’t the point.

If you read this somewhat often, you may wonder how you’ll get that week’s suggestion done (when pertinent). You might still be working on implementing something from a month ago. How are you going to keep up? Thing is, that isn’t the goal of this for either of us.

Have patience

When these things are discussed, my thought process is “I ran across this and/or I do this and it works. If you’re in a similar situation, it might help.” Perhaps you’ll use the info. Maybe you’ll implement some of these things in the future when you’re ready or when they’re pertinent.

Some of the things we discuss each week can’t be done quickly. No one, least of all me, expects you to do them all. Pick the things that make the most sense for where your business is at that moment (if you have time at that moment). Once you start one, keep at it. Don’t take your eye off the ball when seven more weeks of suggestions float by and you haven’t touched them. They don’t matter until they do.

Start fewer things and finish more. There will always be time to start something else once your current tasks are done. You aren’t the only one dealing with occasional chaos.

Many large businesses have the same problems yours has. Maybe the scale of the problem is different – but relative to them, the problems are the same, more or less.

They aren’t perfect either

Let me give you an example. There’s a software as a service (SaaS) vendor we use. As a SaaS vendor, the presumption might be that it’s a reasonably “modern” business that has its act together.

They didn’t bill us for 13 months. Yes… THIRTEEN MONTHS.

This is a large company compared to most small businesses. Yet simple things like getting an invoice out every month somehow failed them for 13 months (and not for the first time). Statements? Nope. Never. Not once in five years.

We were allowed to catch up with those invoices over several months since the lack of them was their fault. Eventually, everything got back to normal.

Before long, they were bought by a public company. Presumption: well-organized company. I mean, by definition, a public company has to have accounting under control, right?

16 months goes by. Still no statements. Most months, we get an invoice. At first, cashing our invoice check takes months, then things smooth out. Because we’re working on a new contract, they recently figured out that three invoices from last fall had not been paid. In fact, the checks had been stopped because they weren’t cashed after several months. We thought they were lost and eventually forgot about them (see, it happens).

They can’t start the new contract until those invoices are paid. We hadn’t received notice about them & soon they were forgotten. $40K of accounts receivable doesn’t typically get ignored when they go unpaid. Neither you or I would do that, but… it happens. We worked it out so everything’s fine. We really like the vendor & they provide quality service.

Stay focused

I tell that story because we’ve almost all had invoicing / follow up issues. You might’ve thought “we’re such a mess I’m never going to be able to do this right” etc.

Yet, the things you beat yourself up about are the same things a publicly held company sometimes does. It happens.

Maybe next week’s suggestion helps. Read them, think about (if) they can apply to your business – but don’t lose sleep over them.

Do the best you can. Improve consistently. Slow is OK, just keep improving.

Photo by Jukan Tateisi on Unsplash

Categories
Getting new customers Lead generation Management Small Business systems

My business is too small!

It may seem that the strategies and tactics we talk about here that are intended to improve your business might relate solely to bigger businesses. A company with lots of staff, a big office and plenty of cash can make these things happen easily, right? And these things apply only to those bigger companies, at least, that’s what you might be thinking. Thing is, that really isn’t true. If your first thought tends to be “my business is too small to do that“, give yourself a chance. Step back a bit and look deeper at what we’re trying to accomplish and let the complexity fade to the background. The key is to pan for gold: find the fundamental outcome that these discussions are about.

A small company will almost never implement things the same way a bigger one would. That doesn’t mean that the small company shouldn’t implement them. Both have the same fundamental needs, like more sales, better leads, faster delivery (or something), and so on.

For example, the discussion might be something that seems complex, like a marketing calendar or lead curation. Both of those things may seem like overkill for a small company – but neither of them are. If we drill down into what they’re trying to accomplish, I think that will become evident.

Let’s talk about what lead curation really is. Why? It’s a great example of one of these “bigger business” things can be implemented by a small, or even one person business… Even if you think “my business is too small”.

What is lead curation?

Leads come into your reach in different stages. They might be ready to buy. The late Chet Holmes said his experience showed that three percent of your market is always ready to buy. The other 97% might be researching, recently decided to investigate, may have determined that their existing solution isn’t doing what they need, and so on. Out of 100 or 100,000 leads, you will find natural groupings like this.

If someone is ready to buy, your sales team (even if the entire team is you) needs to know they’re ready so that someone can start a “ready to buy” conversation with that lead. If someone from your team (or you) have an early-in-the-process kind of conversation with them, you may lose them.

A lead who has recently started researching solutions like yours will likely be put off by a sales person who opens a “ready to buy” conversation. Someone else (or you, if there is no someone else) needs to have the kind of conversation with that lead that will help fulfill their research needs as it relates to your product. This might be the time to provide them with a comparison form (ie: buyer’s guide) that helps them make a purchase decision.

For each stage a lead is in, the conversation that the lead needs to have with your sales team (or you) is a conversation that helps them come to the conclusion that it’s time to move to the next stage. Bear in mind, they don’t necessarily think in these stages, but that doesn’t mean they don’t exist.

That is but one example of “something your business should do”. It’s a good example of something that a bigger company might have software or some sort of system to manage.

You may not have or need those things, but that doesn’t mean the process isn’t important to your success and growth.

“My business is too small for lead curation”

Based on this description of lead curation, it’s not a size thing. It’s all about having the right conversations with people based on where they are in the process of deciding to buy. The smallest company needs to do this – and in fact, the smallest companies are both awesome and horrible at this. You’ll either see them having the same conversation with every lead (horrible), or they will cater very specifically to each lead (awesome).

For a small business, figuring out how to perform lead curation and keep track of what has been done to move your leads through each stage of buying is still important. It isn’t important how the smallest of small businesses does this. It isn’t important how the bigger business does this. It isn’t important that the bigs and the smalls use the same tools or techniques.

What’s important is that it gets done.

Categories
Competition Customer service Leadership Management Positioning Small Business Strategy

Money loves speed

Need for Speed
Creative Commons License photo credit: Amnemona

Dan Kennedy is one of the many well-known business experts who can often be found saying “Money loves speed”. What they mean is speed of implementation. IE: How fast do you take information and take action on it? The faster, the better, as far as your wallet is concerned.

For example, we talked yesterday about pet peeves.

A few hours later, Bruce Johnson was in the middle of his client base’s online community asking what their pet peeves were with his company.

Some business owners would have printed out the post, tossed it on a pile of todo notes and gotten around to it “someday”. That isn’t what Bruce did.

Meanwhile, back at the ranch, someone emailed me and said that the blog looked like crap on Internet Explorer 6 under Windows XP. That long awaited move to WordPress 2.5 simply had to get done, so last night, Business is Personal moved to 2.5 and to a new look and feel (which isn’t quite where I want it…yet).

Every time you look closely at a very successful entrepreneur, you’ll find someone who takes action on information as quickly as possible.

It doesn’t mean they’re always in a hurry (though they might be), it means that they take action. Now. Today.

Not “someday” or “soon”.