Categories
Employee Training Employees Entrepreneurs Leadership

Keep looking for lessons

The previous discussion about chain of command when leadership isn’t supporting their team properly generated a number of private inquiries and comments. One stood out, saying: “You sure run into a lot of broken businesses”. Perhaps so, since helping owners get their companies out of situations like that is one of the things I do. The other, which the last piece spoke to, is helping employers and employees understand each other.

Communication lessons

Employers and employees are stunningly adept at misunderstanding email messages and comments made to one another. They’re not alone. At least once a week, I’ll get an email from a client that asks me to explain what in the world I just said – not because I went too technical, but because I assumed too much. Maybe I remembered the lead up to the conversation better, worse, or differently than they did. Maybe I’m coming from a place that they’re not seeing. Maybe I misunderstood some part (or all) of our last conversation.

Employees and employers struggle with this. This week, a guy was ruffled because his team did something he asked – but in a different context than what he wanted. This happened because he didn’t put himself in their place.. in their mindset.

His people did the wrong thing because they don’t think like owners (hello – they AREN’T owners). They created the resource he asked for in the context of their work, rather than in the context of his.

Unless you explain the WHY, you’re unlikely to get the right WHAT.

Context means everything. Owners and employees are different. They must work harder to understand what each group is really, truly saying.

Ultimately, communication is a team sport. It’s a skill we first learn to do by crying and continue learning, teaching, and sometimes still crying, until the day we die. Which brings me to John Haydon.

Look for the teachers

I didn’t know John well. Like all but one person in the charitable world that I’ve encountered and served on national boards with over the last 20 or 25 years – I never met him. All of these nationally-known people know each other and have met for decades at conferences, on consulting gigs, etc – but that’s not really my work world.

I stumbled across John because of his connection with several of the folks involved in my online-only charitable board relationships. I remembered him and followed his work because of the wisdom of the things he taught, and perhaps a little because his son’s a Scout.

He was a teacher to executives, marketers, and others in the charitable world – an expert at communicating and teaching organizations how to care for the people who donate to their cause. He wasn’t simply good at showing people how to “get the message across”, but thinking about the people who would get your message and grooming that message to have the most impact possible to them. The messages were caring for, relating to, and encouraging them.

A little more than a week before he passed, he gave a very personal interview to Chris Brogan about his experience with cancer, and the conversations he was having with friends, family, and himself. Even in his last week of life, he was teaching his long-time friends and peers via a private Facebook group assembled to help his friends and family share memories with John, say their goodbyes, and eventually, deal with the inevitable.

I mention these things about John because there’s a lesson in there. Here’s a man most likely wracked with pain, knowing he’s facing death in mere days, yet he’s still helping his fellow man by passing along wisdom… on camera, in what was probably his last public act. Even then, he wasn’t done. His book “DonorCARE” is about to be published, so his teaching continues.

Looking for lessons

Those “broken businesses”, the not-so-broken ones, and the stories I tell about them are intended for one purpose: To pass along lessons to you. Sometimes these stories and their lessons fit what’s challenging you that week, sometimes they don’t.

A famous TV personality used to say “Look for the helpers.” To that I would add, “look for the teachers.” They might be a business’ behavior, the behavior of a leader, manager, employee, the staff at a business you frequent, or… a guy named John whom you barely know.

Keep looking.

Photo by Ryan Graybill on Unsplash

Categories
Entrepreneurs

Learned on 9/11

I stepped out of the shower at my parents’ house just moments after the first plane hit. TV news was claiming it was accident, suggesting that a small plane had wandered off course.

It seemed unlikely that a pilot would wander that much off course during daylight hours, particularly that close to two very busy commercial airports. The hole seemed too large for a small plane. It was a perfect day, weather-wise. From my perspective, the accident story didn’t add up. I wondered why the newscast had taken that angle.

The video of the first plane took care of that.

Lessons: Think before you speak. Gather facts, don’t assume. There is little value to rushing to judgment simply for the sake of speed. Trust your gut.

Distractions

I stepped out of the bathroom and stopped in front of the TV. The second plane appeared on the TV screen and removed all doubt about intention vs. accident.

I had flown to Dallas a few days earlier to attend a wedding and a meeting. I planned to drive to Austin that day for a meeting with a business partner. We had a brief call and agreed that neither of us felt good about spending the rest of the day in front of the TV. Letting these acts impact our businesses was simply not how either of us were wired. We had hectic schedules and this was clearly going to complicate life for some time to come. We decided the meeting was on.

My parents didn’t try to talk me out of it. I left for the four hour drive to Austin shortly after the first building collapsed.

Lesson: The easy thing isn’t always the right thing. You can allow the world to distract you, but that’s your choice. I was pretty clear early on that the attacks were terrorism. I remember being resolved to keeping the meeting because I was not going to allow them to prevent us from doing business. It was a small, symbolic victory that I couldn’t be talked out of.

Distributed is good

The radio said all planes were ordered to land ASAP during my drive to Austin. I remember thinking that it was a smart strategy to quickly clarify the status of thousands of airplanes.

We actually got something done during the meeting in Austin, and I drove back to Dallas. News interviews over the next few days showed many people frustrated with being stuck out of town, and unable to return to work or home. Some were collaborating to share a rental, spending thousands to rent a car and drive across the country. Remote work and a distributed company enabled us to live where we wanted. I was fortunate to be at my parents’ place, so I could stick around there as long as necessary.

Lesson: Eliminate unknowns as simply as possible. The simplicity of “land now at the closest airport” reminds us to seek a simple solution. Distributed companies that allow employees to live where they want and work from anywhere suddenly made sense to a lot more people, even though we’d been doing it for years.

Do your clients feel safe?

My return flight was booked for the 12th. I was rescheduled for return to Montana on the first day commercial flights resumed – Sept 15th. The vibe at DFW was strictly by the book. Passengers were tense and quiet. Everyone was quietly scrutinizing their fellow passengers.

Large, muscular athletes in Oklahoma State logo’d outfits started coming down the aisle. I first thought it was the Oklahoma State football team. OSU’s 2011 schedule tells me it probably wasn’t the football team. Their presence changed the passengers’ state of mind. The clear and unspoken change: “this plane is much safer now“.

Lesson:Perception matters. I remember the immediate change in perceived safety and how it changed the vibe on that plane. At the time, I didn’t correlate it to the value of creating a safe environment for your clients – regardless of what safe may mean for them. I later realized how compelling that shift was and how critical it is to create that sort of environment for clients. I’m speaking not simply of perception, but real safety.

Seek out the lessons life and business is trying to teach you, particularly in the worst of times.